Tag Archives: Coloured Pencil

Eire, Seaspray and Seal Girls – A Silent Book Project Update!

Hello again! Here’s hoping your February has been a lovely one!

Following on from my excitable first post of the year (all about meeting and drawing a vole!) there’s a lot I want to share with you!

Firstly, a proper recap on the final months of last year:

-Back in September I joined my Portishead Arts buddies for another exhibition- definitely the best yet! The highlight had to be the sale of one of my absolute favourite artworks to date- “Hook”!

SAMSUNG CSC
“Hook”, Gouache and coloured pencil. (I had such fun experimenting with movement and colour on this one!) © 2017/18 Carina Roberts Illustration

The lovely customers in question bought “Hook” for their new child-to-be, to hang in the nursery.  It’s an indescribable feeling to see something you created make someone so happy!

-I participated in my first outdoor event in October, Made in North Somerset – aside from torrential downpours throughout half of the day it was really pretty lovely- with a surprisingly determined turnout of visitors!

-The highlight of the last months of 2018, though, has to be a round trip to Dublin and Anglesey that my partner and I took. We crossed from Dublin Port to Holyhead on the penultimate morning of our adventure – my first time on a ferry since I was around 5 years old! The journey started very early in the morning, and we watched dawn break over the skyline of Dublin out in a bracing wind. It was lovely and warm inside the ferry but I was having a whale of a time out on the deck, being buffeted about and staving off my impending queasiness!

 

 

Sadly I didn’t get round to that much drawing while we were away (as per usual, we were marching about all over the place too much!) but I took a lot of reference photos!

The whole time we were away, I was thinking about “Cara” – my silent book project about the seal girl.  During the past year it’s been one of those projects I’ve constantly had on my mind, but haven’t really gotten round to writing a proper update on. Well, this is that update! Since I wrote about “Capturing animal behaviours in human form”, I’ve been working on fleshing out the world of the story, as well as breathing more life into the characters themselves. Let me fill you in!

 

Building a world, exploring the land

 

 

Howth, Anglesey and Dublin- ink studies of coastal views!

Selkie legends are told in the Orkney Islands (north of Scotland) and in communities all the way down the UK’s rugged coastline to Ireland. That is to say, although each society  would claim the idea of a seal who can shed its skin and walk on land as a human as its own, it’s really more of a widespread folk tale along our shores. I wasn’t, therefore, looking to recreate one particular area in which to set the story – the West Coast of Ireland, for example- but I was building a world based on all the settlements whose cultures have been shaped by their connection to the sea. To speak through the environment of this story, I have to make it recognisable, even nostalgic for those who have grown up among these surroundings, and capture part of the culture to explain them to those who haven’t.

A bit of a meaty aim, really.

In terms of research, though, this couldn’t have been more fun! I’ve carried my camera and my sketchbook around the UK and beyond wherever I go, and take as many notes and drawings as possible! (This ties in neatly with one of my main drawing goals from the past couple of years- GET BETTER AT DRAWING BUILDINGS!)

Those who are avid readers of this blog might remember my “Kernow” project– drawings of Cornwall from a surprise trip we took for my Mum’s birthday- completed for this purpose exactly!

 

 

In the same way that drawing from my experiences of Marazion, Penzance and St. Ives helped me to remember all the little nooks we’d discovered along the way, I realised that it was going to take lots and LOTS of drawings to build up a gradual picture of a coastal location, to create a convincing setting for the story.

Also around this time was when I rediscovered the work of one of my absolute favourite illustrators, Raymond Briggs, and began to take notes about his storytelling. (Incidentally, I watched an amazing documentary called “Raymond Briggs: Snowmen, Bogeymen and Milkmen” – if you have even the slightest interest in Mr. Briggs or his work, I urge you to take a look!) A couple of his books feature very few, if any words – the narrative is unfurled through animation-like sequences of smaller images.

The Snowman - Raymond Briggs

I started having a go at some sequential narrative inspired by how Briggs tells his stories.

Jowder's Hallway (Final) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“The Hallway” – a short sequential narrative exploring a character’s movement through their home. (Reference- cottage in Marazion, Cornwall) © 2017/18 Carina Roberts Illustration

With his processes in mind, and in order to make use of all those reference photos I’d taken in Dublin, Anglesey and elsewhere too, I challenged myself during Inktober this year to draw a short journey that could somehow inspire, or fit into, the story of Cara.

 

“The Bike Ride” – Quink ink, white pencil, calligraphy ink.

The resulting month’s drawings (above) introduced a typical weatherbeaten, salt-sprayed village recovering from a coastal storm. Only one figure really features throughout the whole sequence- unintentional when I begun the drawings, but useful to realise partway through the challenge, as I started to think of the project as a 31 “frame” glimpse through the eyes of someone who travels through it every day. This sequence became a way to introduce both of my main characters- like in a photo album, each image represents some memory to the little lad Ronan of the day he found an injured seal. As I worked on his physical appearance in tandem with this sequence, I thought about how I could symbolise elements of his personality in these little thumbnails.

For example, the sea is pivotal to setting the scene of the story, but having it feature in so many of the images could suggest that this little boy thinks about it a lot – does water calm him when he’s had a bad day? Or could he even see the sea as a threat, something he’s afraid of perhaps? And the aforementioned lack of other characters featuring throughout the panels- does he prefer to be alone, or does he simply live in quite an isolated community? Could he even be lonely?

This explosion of questions revealed a whole new side to the characters I was designing- particularly this little chap. Understanding more about his personality meant that I could now go all-out to design a character to match!

 

Traits embodied- character design progression over the last year

Over the course of the previous few months, Ronan has been emerging slowly, shyly- a thoughtful young fellow, quite the opposite to the exuberant seal-girl he befriends.

(Below- some of my first sketches deciding on Ronan’s appearance!)

Ronan sketch 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Ronan” – An early sketch and reference point. Woolly hair, salt-stiffened but carefully kept. © 2017/18 Carina Roberts Illustration
Ronan sketch - Coat 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Ronan’s Coat” – Experimenting with a big layer of clothing a shy child can hide behind and inside… © 2017/18 Carina Roberts Illustration
Ronan's Home Final (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“A quick rest” © 2017/18 Carina Roberts Illustration
Ronan and Cara 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Meeting the locals” – Ronan’s method of rescuing an injured seal. (Also, a quick impression of how a native might react to a seal in the middle of town!) © 2017/18 Carina Roberts Illustration

Something I’ve really enjoyed planning is how I can portray characters without any of the clues that might come from dialogue- this is a wordless picture book, after all! When developing both Ronan and Cara, this has forced me to concentrate my efforts on their expressions and body language almost exclusively to show their complimentary personalities.

I rediscovered the classic series “Camberwick Green” and its sibling programme “Trumpton” back in October 2018 when I wasn’t feeling well. Interestingly, I observed that throughout both programmes, mouths are really only visible on characters that are speaking loudly or shouting- a lot of the story is told through their gestures and expressions instead!

Screen Shot 2018-12-10 at 10.55.04
Captain Snort of Pippin Fort- his mouth is often visible as he shouts at his troops!
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Concentration… Mickey Murphy the baker’s mouth is rarely seen, he’s too busy to be talking!

 

(Left- “Ronan’s jumper” – experimenting with textures and patterns inspired by the Aran wool shops in Dublin. Right- building on sequences of movement, and subtle expression which can still say a lot!)

Ronan expression sheet FV (LR) © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Early expression sheet” – Planning subtle emotional responses of Ronan. Some expressions are missing- for the boy who feels deeply, but doesn’t always show it…     © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration

“Camberwick Green” became an important influence in character development- and not just for Ronan! The energetic, animated gesticulations of some of the busier characters gave me a great deal of inspiration in how to portray Cara’s personality through her movements. As a reminder from my previous post, this was how she began:

“… a human character with all of the heart, soul and playfulness of a seal. Clumsy, comical on land, unbelievably graceful in water. Cheeky, intelligent, sometimes greedy; inquisitive, sometimes shy and others very aggressive!”

To begin with, I had worked on aligning Cara’s seal and human counterparts- for example carrying through her colouring as a young seal, replacing her whiskers and mottled fur with hairy eyebrows and freckles. Very quickly though, I realised that something was missing- in a lot of traditional depictions of the selkie which I’d looked at in my early research, the human aspect ended up being willowy, slim; with none of the substance and weight of a seal.

So I’ve been studying heavier, rounder and stronger body shapes, to unite Cara in both of her skins!

Cara simplified sketch (LR) © 2018:19 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Seated” – An early digital sketch to work out simple shapes to include in Cara’s form. © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration
Cara character sketches (levels, neatened - FV LR) © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Experimenting with rounder shapes- how might borrowed, loose clothing fall around Cara’s seal-like form?  (Beginning to explore textures) © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration
Cara lineup (LR) © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration
How can Cara’s gestures occupy space, in order to demonstrate her exuberant personality? (Continuing exploration of borrowed clothing.) “Cara studies” – 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration

 

(Above- (Left) Inquistive exploration of a new environment- how would a seal react to household objects? (Right) “Patchwork Bundle” – Exploring textures, form and bright colours. © 2018/19 Carina Roberts Illustration

What Does A Seal Dream? LR © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration
“What Does a Seal Dream?” © 2019 Carina Roberts Illustration       Bright colours reveal Cara’s sunny personality with no explanation needed!

 

My mind has been bursting waiting to share this work with you! I’m so, so happy with how this concept is developing- another update will be along later in the year! In the mean-time, please never forget the importance of your more personal projects- when your heart and soul goes into something, it really shows!

Next time, I’ll be discussing the design process for some new dog-themed Mother’s Day greetings cards I’ve produced this year!

Until then, all the very best of wishes,

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shape and colour – rediscovering the palette knife!

Hello again, radiant readers!

It’s been a busy few months since my last post, and I have lots to share with you!

I’m so excited to announce that I was longlisted for the Templar Illustration Prize a few weeks ago… My name was officially listed within the top ten entries, which was such an incredible surprise! I unfortunately wasn’t selected in the final three shortlist, but I got so much further than I thought I would- it’s an amazing step for me as an illustrator!

A short snippet about that to begin with- it was a really interesting project to complete, we had to submit a cover design, storyboard to explore the book’s narrative and layout, and a completed artwork spread for a book about dragons aimed within the age bracket of 0-12 years. I learnt a lot during this project, and visited some pretty interesting places for research (one, a birthday trip to St. Fagan’s in Wales – to study and draw old buildings!)

"Cover" FINAL ( + text) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
The final draft cover of my dragon themed project for Templar’s 40 Year Illustration Competition- “The Island”. © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

 

Alongside what is becoming my signature painting style of gouache and coloured pencil (with a teeny bit of ink thrown in!) I explored (and revisited) lots of different mediums and techniques to decide how to create the final artworks for this project. Bleach and lemon juice into ink to produce botanical patterns, scraping and “rock rubbing” to create texture…

At the core of this exploration was the underlying principle to simplify all elements of the final artwork which weren’t the direct focus. For example, in the cover artwork depicted above, I spent days painting sea and waves to come up with a way to make them noticeable, but not so detailed that they would distract away from the dragon floating in the middle. I needed a way to produce flowing, swirling water which could look different every time I painted it, a technique with a little bit of a mind of its own…

Then I rediscovered my Grandma’s trusty old palette knife.

I haven’t used a palette knife since the second year of university during a life-drawing lesson with oils, but I thought I’d give it a go for this project.

Painting stripes of pure colour onto the palette knife and dragging it across the page produced some really interesting sketchbook studies, as well as scuffing back across dried blocks of colour to create waves. (Scuffing a little paint across a very finely-textured sketchbook page can give some really interesting textures too – as I’ll explore a little later on!)

Geometric Waves
Painting the sea! © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Something I’ve always shied away from when painting flowing or floaty objects without clear lines is using geometrical shapes to help build the final outcome. As the palette knife I was using has one long, tapered point, I thought I might break down some walls and attempt a rough sea constructed from triangles.

Triangular Waves
A close-up… © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

While it seemed a little alien to be be painting something which moves about so much in such a static way at first, the exercise of using triangles to create this ocean really helped me to build a sense of background and foreground, as well as liveliness in the waves. Blocking simple colour in like this allowed for more complicated processes over the top:

Little Red Boat - Top to Toe
Sample oceans to hold a little tugboat. © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
Little Red Boat
© 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
Little Red Boat v2
Stripes of colour applied to the palette knife, (darkest at the bottom, lightest at the top) placed on the page and dragged in a single diagonal movement from top left to bottom right really worked as a technique to create larger, more dramatic waves for the little boat to perch atop! © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

After this project was finished and sent off, I turned my head back to getting some Spring/Summer animal themed greetings cards designs ready for 2018. In a similar train of thought as when I was working on “The Island”, I wondered how I could use the palette knife to help bring new depth into my artwork.

SAMPLES OF EARTH

Again, the decision in using the palette knife to work out a backdrop in these greetings cards was to lend more sharpness to the foreground focus- be it animal, mineral or vegetable- equally adding some context to the main attention of the artwork, in this case a mole burrowing.

In the development stage of this particular design I used similar dragging techniques as I had when exploring the water in “The Island”, as well as loading up the palette knife with mixed colours to dab and scrape over pre-dried layers, to create bobbles, lumps and lines, as you would find in real earth.

Earth sample 1 (smaller file)

Earth sample v2 (Smaller file)

Earth Sample 4 (Smaller file)
Scraping the first layer of dark colour across the clean page at the bottom seemed to help accentuate the dandelion roots!! © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Next, came the moles, happy burrowing in Spring through the damp earth for the juiciest earthworms!

Mole selection
Using a paintbrush for the foremost element of the design, the main character, helped to keep the outlines clean- as well as brighter colours, cementing him the focus of the whole shebang.     © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Little mole spring blank v2 Mole sketch v3Little mole spring blank v1 Little mole spring blank v1.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above are some snippets from next stage of the development for this design; some of the thumbnails from working on the final layout. The palette knife scrapes began to suggest the flinging of dirt as the mole speedily dug away his tunnel, placing him firmly in his own little story. If the mole had no backdrop here, he might look a little as though he was swimming or floating through space, but having that extra layer lets him reveal to the viewer a little piece of his life. (As my skill lies mainly in narrative illustration, you can see how it seeps into all of my other projects too!)

One thing I really want to attempt next is rust- as a side-note for my silent book project I’ve begun a small sketchbook on boats as research to support a couple of the spreads, so whenever I’m in a port or seaside town I’ll be a-scribbling, with particular interest in the older behemoths which are busy oxidising and gathering sealife!

My next post will be based around an AMAZING trip to Malta, (I arrived back yesterday!) – it’s given me some really interesting ideas for my SWLA (Society of Wildlife Artists) competition entry – another little something I’ve been meaning to do in the past, which I’m really knuckling down to enter this year!

Thanks for reading- hope you’re having a great time wherever you are, and continue to find a little inspiration in every day!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

Kernow- A visual diary!

Happy New Year all!

What a wild and stormy start to 2018! Here’s hoping you’re warm and dry, and haven’t been affected by the wind and rain too badly!

I wonder how many people out there started this year (or any new year!) feeling a little anxious? A whole 365 new days stretching out from here to what feels like eternity, full of expectations, resolutions and challenges- a certain desperation in feeling you HAVE to do something new and exciting this year while still fulfilling all of your previous commitments? I’m sure it’s most of us!

In the past feelings like this have overwhelmed me- there’s so much that I want to do, that I’ll take on too much at once, and feel bad because I didn’t finish everything I wanted to. Now, I’m trying my best every new year to think of something specific to focus on for the coming months in order to better my practice (and myself) to really target my weaknesses!

For example, I’ve never really liked drawing buildings. As a child, animals, humans and landscapes always caught my attention- they seemed to offer so much more in terms of colour, texture and movement to work with. As my love and skill for drawing more organic subjects grew, the frustrations with drawing buildings just multiplied. Perspectives of streets confused me, windows and bricks just always came out looking so … boring. Much like you can often tell an artists’ mood by looking at their artwork, you could tell a lot of my relationship with drawing buildings from my project work – a hope, a desperation to make it look perfect, then a flat, dull finished piece where I’d once again given up.

A couple of years ago, on a resolution-making day, I thought a lot about drawing buildings. I thought about my university course, and my wonderful tutors who had always seemed to know how to help me out of my comfort zone into something I was really passionate about. It’s been at the back of my mind ever since- when I went to Dublin and Edinburgh I took hundreds of pictures to help me study oddly shaped and colourful buildings, and dedicated a section of my external hard drive to artists who had drawn or painted them.

In Rain - Ludwig Bemelmans
Ludwig Bemelmans – from “Madeline” – “In Rain…”

I discovered two key things during this ongoing study.

a) My buildings didn’t have to be architecturally perfect. Not every window, door and brick had to be identical- in fact, the more I embraced the different shapes as opposed to getting bogged down in the detail, the more improvement I noticed.

b) The interest in buildings for me doesn’t necessarily lie in how they look… Their relationship to outside effects- eg. age, weather, daily routines happening around them is where their appeal lies.

In November of last year, my brother and I organised a surprise trip to Cornwall for my Mum’s birthday. Despite my previous studies, I realised during this visit that I’d never completed a project solely based around buildings. So, over the next couple of months, I documented our journeys around Marazion, Penzance and St. Ives through the buildings we came across, as often as I could completing a piece per day as a warm-up. One of my official New Year’s resolutions was to complete this project, and this post is designed to share it with you!

Kernow- A Visual Diary – © 2017/2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

The King's Arms (signed) 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“The King’s Arms” – Marazion

 

St. Ives Street (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“St. Ives Street” – St. Ives
St. Ives Street 2 - Elderly couple © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St Ives Street 2 – The Climb” – St. Ives
St. Ives Fishmonger (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Fishmonger” – St. Ives
St. Ives Day (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Daily Route” – St. Ives
Marazion High Street (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“High Street” – Marazion
St. Ives Street III Final (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St. Ives Street 3”
Marazion High Street - Night Final (low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Night” – Marazion
St. Ives Street 4 Final (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St. Ives Street 4” – St. Ives
Cornish Pub sketch final (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“The Sloop Inn” – St. Ives
Penzance Harbour (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Penzance Harbour” – Penzance
Penzance Pub (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Penzance Pub” – Penzance
Market Place- St. Ives (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Market Place” – St. Ives
Marazion street painting (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Marazion Street” – Marazion
Jowder's Cottage (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Jowders Morning” – Marazion
Washing Day Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Washing Day” – St. Ives
Beach Garden Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Beach Garden” – St. Ives
Marazion Dusk Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Dusk” – Marazion

 

I’m slowly improving in my building painting- in that I’ve learned a huge amount about why I always hated them as subject matter, and how I can apply the skills I’ve enjoyed in illustrating other things to making them interesting to me!

As you can see from some of these pages, I’m also actively doing a lot more work with different types of lighting (which has also scared me in the past) – another of my resolutions this year! There’s a post I would like to write soon about a very showery walk I went on recently up quite a steep hill- the patches of cloud and sunlight dancing across the blustery sky made for some really impressive lighting, which is my next challenge to have a go at painting since finishing this mini-project!

There’s a lot to look forward to this year, and a lot of work to be done… But that’s how I like it!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.