Kernow- A visual diary!

Happy New Year all!

What a wild and stormy start to 2018! Here’s hoping you’re warm and dry, and haven’t been affected by the wind and rain too badly!

I wonder how many people out there started this year (or any new year!) feeling a little anxious? A whole 365 new days stretching out from here to what feels like eternity, full of expectations, resolutions and challenges- a certain desperation in feeling you HAVE to do something new and exciting this year while still fulfilling all of your previous commitments? I’m sure it’s most of us!

In the past feelings like this have overwhelmed me- there’s so much that I want to do, that I’ll take on too much at once, and feel bad because I didn’t finish everything I wanted to. Now, I’m trying my best every new year to think of something specific to focus on for the coming months in order to better my practice (and myself) to really target my weaknesses!

For example, I’ve never really liked drawing buildings. As a child, animals, humans and landscapes always caught my attention- they seemed to offer so much more in terms of colour, texture and movement to work with. As my love and skill for drawing more organic subjects grew, the frustrations with drawing buildings just multiplied. Perspectives of streets confused me, windows and bricks just always came out looking so … boring. Much like you can often tell an artists’ mood by looking at their artwork, you could tell a lot of my relationship with drawing buildings from my project work – a hope, a desperation to make it look perfect, then a flat, dull finished piece where I’d once again given up.

A couple of years ago, on a resolution-making day, I thought a lot about drawing buildings. I thought about my university course, and my wonderful tutors who had always seemed to know how to help me out of my comfort zone into something I was really passionate about. It’s been at the back of my mind ever since- when I went to Dublin and Edinburgh I took hundreds of pictures to help me study oddly shaped and colourful buildings, and dedicated a section of my external hard drive to artists who had drawn or painted them.

In Rain - Ludwig Bemelmans
Ludwig Bemelmans – from “Madeline” – “In Rain…”

I discovered two key things during this ongoing study.

a) My buildings didn’t have to be architecturally perfect. Not every window, door and brick had to be identical- in fact, the more I embraced the different shapes as opposed to getting bogged down in the detail, the more improvement I noticed.

b) The interest in buildings for me doesn’t necessarily lie in how they look… Their relationship to outside effects- eg. age, weather, daily routines happening around them is where their appeal lies.

In November of last year, my brother and I organised a surprise trip to Cornwall for my Mum’s birthday. Despite my previous studies, I realised during this visit that I’d never completed a project solely based around buildings. So, over the next couple of months, I documented our journeys around Marazion, Penzance and St. Ives through the buildings we came across, as often as I could completing a piece per day as a warm-up. One of my official New Year’s resolutions was to complete this project, and this post is designed to share it with you!

Kernow- A Visual Diary – © 2017/2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

The King's Arms (signed) 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“The King’s Arms” – Marazion

 

St. Ives Street (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“St. Ives Street” – St. Ives
St. Ives Street 2 - Elderly couple © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St Ives Street 2 – The Climb” – St. Ives
St. Ives Fishmonger (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Fishmonger” – St. Ives
St. Ives Day (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Daily Route” – St. Ives
Marazion High Street (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“High Street” – Marazion
St. Ives Street III Final (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St. Ives Street 3”
Marazion High Street - Night Final (low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Night” – Marazion
St. Ives Street 4 Final (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St. Ives Street 4” – St. Ives
Cornish Pub sketch final (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“The Sloop Inn” – St. Ives
Penzance Harbour (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Penzance Harbour” – Penzance
Penzance Pub (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Penzance Pub” – Penzance
Market Place- St. Ives (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Market Place” – St. Ives
Marazion street painting (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Marazion Street” – Marazion
Jowder's Cottage (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Jowders Morning” – Marazion
Washing Day Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Washing Day” – St. Ives
Beach Garden Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Beach Garden” – St. Ives
Marazion Dusk Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Dusk” – Marazion

 

I’m slowly improving in my building painting- in that I’ve learned a huge amount about why I always hated them as subject matter, and how I can apply the skills I’ve enjoyed in illustrating other things to making them interesting to me!

As you can see from some of these pages, I’m also actively doing a lot more work with different types of lighting (which has also scared me in the past) – another of my resolutions this year! There’s a post I would like to write soon about a very showery walk I went on recently up quite a steep hill- the patches of cloud and sunlight dancing across the blustery sky made for some really impressive lighting, which is my next challenge to have a go at painting since finishing this mini-project!

There’s a lot to look forward to this year, and a lot of work to be done… But that’s how I like it!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

 

 

“Cara”- Capturing animal behaviours in human form

Cara sleeping © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Hello my lovelies!

It’s been a while again, hasn’t it? This particular post has been a long time coming, but as it concerns a very special project I couldn’t rush it!

As I mentioned back in August, this time I’ll be discussing the development of a human character with all the grace of a seal, in a story I’m devloping which draws upon one of my favourite Irish legends. This project will eventually be put forward as an entry for a competition, so I’m not going to share much of the finished work until it’s all submitted. I can, however, share with you my process thus far of how this character has developed!

A little to begin with for those who haven’t yet understood the Irish legend I’m referring to.

The Selkie was a mythical creature who lived as a seal in the water, who by shedding its blubbery skin on land, would become human. Most of the stories I had read about Selkies had been sad, mostly where female Selkies had come ashore to have their skins hidden by possessive men who wanted to marry them for their beauty. If the skins were not found, the Selkie would remain trapped on land and could never return to the ocean.

Poor seals!

One thing I always found a little strange about the classic depiction of all the lady Selkies was their grace and poise on land. Of course, they may have been journeying out of the water every week to practice walking on land for all I know, but it got me thinking; how might a Selkie be who had never been out of the water before? Would they know how to walk down a flight of stairs, or sleep in a bed?

I wanted to create a human character with all of the heart, soul and playfulness of a seal. Clumsy, comical on land, unbelievably graceful in water. Cheeky, intelligent, sometimes greedy; inquisitive, sometimes shy and others very aggressive!

To begin this journey, I had to plunge headfirst into the realm of the seal.

The Seal Study

Seal behaviour sketches (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration .jpg
Seals drawn from BBC’s “Wild Ireland”.

Despite being one of my most favourite animals, I had never seen a seal in real life before setting out on this project. I’d seen sea lions at the zoo when I was younger, but they just weren’t the same (and also not native to UK or Irish waters.) In this case, the study of a seal’s behaviour was my first step in creating this very special character.

I did some research, discovering that one of the best times to see seals on land was during their breeding season, beginning round about September. One of the best places in the UK to track them down was apparently in West Pembrokeshire, on and around Skomer island. So, my partner and I made the trek across, to discover that the boat (due to bad weather) was not running that day. The crossing for Skomer is very near a National Trust walk around the Marloes Peninsula which we decided to do instead, to see if we could spot any of the elusive grey seals we were after from the cliff edges.

We were not disappointed.

Marloes Seals 2 (Detail 2) (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Mother seal, making her way into the cold Pembrokeshire ocean. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Marloes Seals (Detail) (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Waiting for the wave to pass… © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Marloes Seals 1 (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Seal sketches- Pembrokeshire (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Young seal pup still sporting its “lanugo”, (fluffy white baby coat) dragging itself across the sand to visit an older relative.

After this experience, I was looking everywhere for more seal inspiration to draw from. The first sketchbook I started for this project is absolutely bursting with hundreds of seals- from life, books, television, anywhere they could be found.

Seals eating plan
Did you know, a seal commonly has 3-6 pairs of eyebrows? © Artwork 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

I began to look for detail in each seal that I could use to start drafting a closely linked human character. The huge, liquid eyes, dark facial markings, and fluffed out, podgy, strong bodies of the animals I was studying were all things that seemed important to help draw the comparison between the two.

Cara seal expression sheet final (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Cara” – Exploring her human form. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Cara detail portrait (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Cara Portrait” – Dark whiskers on the seal pup’s face become a maze of freckles and thick eyebrows.  © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

After plenty of initial scribbling to begin to understand how Cara, as I named her, would translate into her more human guise, my next step was to explore how her movement might register as comically un-human. The natural starting point was to teach her how to walk.

Cara learns to walk (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Cara learns to walk” – Sketch page. Trying to keep the low gravity and toddling, unsteady gait of a much younger child was my aim in “teaching” Cara to walk as a person. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Every action Cara undertakes as a person initially has to look deliberate, determined and a little clumsy, to match the seal inside. Despite being a book concept, I have begun to plan certain spreads in my first dummy version of this story as you might a hand-drawn animation- exploring movement by movement how best to present a particular scene and different ways she might tackle them. As a method of working this hadn’t been planned from the start- but for a character with such unusual movements it’s far becoming my favourite!

Cara meal sketch detail (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“The Meal” – detail from a sketchbook page. “Her freckled face peering inquisitvely over the bowl’s rim.” © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

One sequence I’m planning at the moment involves Cara’s first meal as a human. This would be the first instance where she would encounter crockery, cutlery, sitting down to eat (as well as table manners!) I’ve heard it said by many veteran illustrators that the best images depict the split second before something happens. Drawing close to frame by frame has helped me to determine the moment between intrigue and face-first feasting within this scene!

This is going to be a long journey, but one I feel really excited about. I’m still planning the first dummy draft of the full book, but each page of this is surrounded with notes- notes of research and reference material that will help make this world more real, as well as different, possibly more effective alternative spreads that I can trial alongside the one in this first draft. Like a comedy routine, it takes a lot of work and rehearsal to find the perfect joke- and to find the most effective ways to present the lovable, clumsy, and kind-hearted soul that is Cara.

——————————————–

Next time I’ll be sharing a visual diary from a recent trip to Cornwall- a mini-project I undertook to tackle some of my illustrative worries head on!

Thanks for reading!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Movement in Murmurations- Exploring patterns in the natural world through classical music

Good afternoon, lovely ones! Hope your weeks are all going well!

Last time, I told you the tale of a little house martin chick and my once-in-a-lifetime drawing experience with her. (If you didn’t get to read it yet, just have a quick scroll, you’ll find it beneath this post – “A Precious Thing”.) A quick update- she had her first flying lessons indoors, and has since been fully re-released back into the wild! She’s probably off on her own adventures by now, using those new fully-grown wings!

Around a month ago I found out about the SWLA exhibition held through the Mall Galleries in London – Wildlife Artist of the Year. I’m afraid I was a little over-optimistic in planning something to enter for the competition this year, but I’m slowly going to be developing my research over the coming months, ready for next year’s competition.

Completely by chance, and neatly linking into the house martin’s story since last time, I wanted to follow a bird theme for this competition. I so often draw mammals that birds weren’t really getting the recognition they deserved, and as well as wanting to try something a bit different, they were on my mind anyway due to my work earlier this year on the RPSB’s Big Garden Birdwatch at nursery.  Although the final artwork for the SWLA competition is far from fruition, I thought I would share some of my process up until now- as I really believe it could be something special!

The co-ordinator of a drawing event I attended a couple of years ago referred to the way I drew as “lyrical” – that I described not only my reference material but also the music I listened to at the time. I had been listening quite a lot to Rossini’s “The Thieving Magpie” Overture over a week’s period while working on a separate project, and one evening after reading the brief for the SWLA competition, the song and an earlier memory of some starlings grouped and swirling over a park in Wales (a murmuration) paired up in my mind.  I got thinking about how patterns in some classical music fit so perfectly within nature- and decided to do a little research.

As many things in nature are, I discovered that the pattern of a murmuration occurs through mathematics (more specifically in this case- mathematical chaos; where very small changes have a huge impact within the larger system) as every slight movement by each bird within a murmuration is amplified by all the other birds flying directly around it, creating the waves and rippling effects. The few times in my life I had seen a murmuration, I couldn’t help but conjure up a mental picture of a musical score, with all the birds within the pattern as individual notes within an orchestra, acting individually but also within the larger pattern of the whole. How could I replicate this in a drawing? As an experiment and something outside of my comfort zone a little, I decided to listen to some classical music and try drawing lines to describe what I was hearing. The drawings below are based on the aforementioned Rossini overture- “The Thieving Magpie”, or “La Gazza Ladra”. (You could try listening to it as you look at the following experiments- see if you can spot where the patterns came from!)

Murmuration ink sketches (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg

Step One – Feeling the music out!

The lines and marks that came out of this initial exercise follow the pitch and movement of the music.

After that, I followed the lines I’d drawn with tiny dots, or tiny birds, to bring the “murmuration” to life. The process was a little daunting at first, especially as the pen and ink I was using has a tendency to “blob” a bit! (Although after the first ten minutes, I actually quite liked the imperfection of the ink blobs!)

Murmuration ink sketches 1 (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration .jpg
Adding in the starlings, the beginnings of weaving each line together

As I attempted to follow the music in shape, I also tried to match the volume to the weight of the line I drew. As I begun to add the starlings in, I followed the same pattern- with more birds in the thicker areas, and just a scattering in the wispy lines. (I would like to try removing the lines to see what shapes I’m left with here, but that’s something for later!)

Murmuration ink sketches (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
And now, for the crescendo…!

As the speed and volume of the song built towards its end, so did the patterns… the spiral that begins at the left hand side of this page came from the final minute of the overture. Filling this space with birds was probably the best part of the whole exercise, and although it doesn’t ring completely true to how starlings might fly in real life, I’m sure there’s elements of this wild drawing that I can expand upon for the final artwork! After all, every bird in this spiral is attempting to fly as close as it possibly can to its neighbour: the ripple created at the bottom of the murmuration becomes less tense, and more and more amplified as it moves outwards- the same theory to how a real murmuration works!

I look forward to the next few months developing this idea and sharing updates on my progress along the way- it’s something a bit different to what I usually do, but that’s the most exciting part!

Next time, I’ll be writing a little about my progress on my silent book concept for a different competition (yes, finally! It’s been a while, but as promised, I’m getting round to it!) and how I’ve been developing a human character who has all the grace and appetite of a young seal!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

A precious thing!

Dear readers,

Happy July! I hope that wherever you are, you get the chance to have at least one icecream in the sunshine in the coming weeks! (If you’ve already had one… Get another for yourself and a friend so they can enjoy a treat and your overwhelming generosity!)

I’ve got so much to tell you about, I have been writing furiously about projects I’ve been working on over the past couple of months (including an update on the silent book concept I first mentioned at the end of last year!)

At the moment they’re all sat waiting for final edits in my “drafts” folder, but my aim is to release one every two- three weeks now (as I haven’t been very good with keeping up with my blog posts yet this year!)  – I’ve got a few crackers to share!

Something incredible happened this weekend, though, that before I could release any of my previous writing I HAD to share with you; before I burst with excitement, love and gratitude. A once in a lifetime experience, both fascinating and humbling.

For about a month I’ve been pretty down in the dumps after recovering from a particularly nasty flu bug. You know the type: the kind that karate-chops you to your knees and sends you packing to bed, and when you try to get up and make an effort to do something productive (to break the seemingly endless tedium of feeling teary and sore and sorry for yourself) it all goes a bit pear-shaped, your concentration is at 0% and the whole horrid cycle starts again. The sort that you’re sure is just hanging in there until you do one too many things in your week again, and re-releases all your favourite smash hits (like your amazing manly chesty cough that lends your impression of Tom Jones an extra something) and you just know it’s about to claw it’s way back to full strength again.

I went to visit my partner and his parents in order to hopefully throw this bug off once and for all; with fresh air, exercise and to see some animals.

And see some animals I did.

My partner’s father had taken in a house martin chick which was the only survivor from a flooded nest. He hadn’t suspected it to be alive much longer, but after over a week of feeding it with tweezers it had transformed into a plump little creature, with open, clear eyes and adult feathers just beginning to develop. I witnessed her many mealtimes and even had a go at feeding her, which was beautiful in itself- the food preparation “station” was next to her makeshift nest, and as we cut up the food into manageable pieces for her to swallow, she would cheep incredibly loudly and flap her tiny wings in excitement.

I asked one evening if I might be able to draw her. We brought her makeshift nest to the table, and the lamp my partner’s father used to keep her warm at night was used for a bit of extra light. As soon as I opened my sketchbook, she began to cheep, watching my every move with her tiny, beady eyes. She was around a foot away from me, and I could see every little detail on her tiny body; the youngster fluff clinging to the top of her head like large eyebrows, her perfect little wings and tail, with juvenile feathers coming through. I have never seen eyes so small or intense, each one no bigger than an individual blackberry pip, watching me with unbroken concentration, trying to work out if my pencils were food or not.

With music coming from the next room, I recognised an Irish folk song cover, the tune to which I learnt from the “Song of the Sea” film by Cartoon Saloon. I can’t speak Irish, but I know the title is “Dúlamán”, and even if I can’t understand the lyrics at present I know what the words should sound like, so I always have a good crack at singing along. As I drew I instinctively started humming and mumbling along, quietly so as not to frighten the little creature sat inches away from me.

And, in the way that she only ever did before when she was full and sleepy, the chick stopped cheeping. She looked me square in the eye as I sang, almost as though she was listening. I carried on drawing, but I barely looked down at my paper. Those tiny eyes held my gaze so ferociously I didn’t dare. In those precious moments I could almost see her first flights, her migrations, perhaps further than I might ever get in all my years in her first three or four. She sat silently until the song had finished, then almost as though she had been paused, she began cheeping and watching my paper again.

I have never stared for quite so long into the eyes of a wild creature before, but there was something in that sitting that is what every art tutor or teacher in the land tries to convey when they say they prefer you to draw from first-hand experiences, from life. There was energy rumbling through that little chick’s whole being that I never would have understood just from a photograph. Someone told me once that my work can be quite “lyrical”- if I listen to music as I draw, some of it in translated into the lines I use. Singing to that little creature allowed me to record just a tiny ounce of that experience into my favourite sketchbook.

All at once, that one intense, three minute eye-lock has cured me better than any flu medicine ever could.

Housemartin final 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
A beautiful creature. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

Oceans and Woodsmoke- British Coastlines and Baby Steps in Pyrography

Hello wonderful readers!

I’m afraid this post has been a bit of a long time coming, hasn’t it… How is it May already?! I hope your 2017 is off to a cracking start!

By way of a quick catchup, here’s a little about my year so far, and why I’ve been ignoring my blog-writing duties!

I had a little adventure to Edinburgh with my partner back in February, my first time in Scotland! The flight in was really quite amazing- zooming right in over the sea, feeling like you’re almost skimming the various little jutting islands and great hulking boats chugging out of the harbour!

Aerial Approach to Edinburgh planning sketch (75DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
The flight to Edinburgh- a view through the plane’s window!

The city centre itself was really something else- with all the hills and different street levels, it’s possible to get some really spectacular views over the rooftops! The castle is visible from wherever you are sitting proud up on its mountain, watching over and protecting all the smaller buildings that sprawl out and around it.

Edinburgh Castle sketch (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
© 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration –                A quick sketch on a freezing hillside!

A large part of my time since Christmas has been split between working on my Silent Book concept for the yearly competition at Bologna and preparing for another North Somerset Arts Week with some of my local artist chums! This time around, all my work was inspired by the theme of “Wild Coast”, working from a brief I wrote up back in January to create a completely new range of occasion greetings cards, prints and large artworks, to explore some of my favourite journeys from the past couple of years in and around British and Irish coastlines.

Working so hard in my silent book project to tell the narrative through pictures alone I found spilled over into this “Wild Coast” brief- even into the greetings cards! I began the ideas process for these cards by thinking which animals I could use to celebrate each occasion. After plenty of sketching and research into the animals themselves, the designs started to take shape, including dogs, seals, rays, crabs and puffins.  Before I knew it, the puffins had organised themselves into a little family, and through a series of three occasion cards told the story of the birth of a puffin couple’s first chick!

© 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration – (1) “Puffin Love” –        The puffin couple rub beaks as a mark of affection, reinforcing their partnership. (Designed as a “Love” card- for an anniversary, for the birthday of a special someone etc.)
Mother Puffin Final (Low res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
   © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration – “Mother Puffin” –                 A single egg and chick is raised each year by a puffin couple, watched carefully by the parents. (Designed as a Mother’s Day or New Baby card)
Good Luck, Puffling! (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
© 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration – “Puffling takes flight” – Despite their devotion to the egg, juvenile puffins are left to their own devices for their first flight- perhaps shaping them into the plucky birds we know them as. Young puffins will not get their distinctive colouring until adulthood. (Designed as a “Good Luck” card!)

Over the next couple of days, I’m working to upload some of these occasion designs to my Thortful profile- here –  ready for sale- keep your eyes peeled for lots of coastal creatures!)

North Somerset Arts Week takes place every two years. It’s easy to forget what can be, and what is achieved in that length of time as you plod through your day-to day life! In my practice alone, I finally listened to various arty friends and set out working with gouache instead of normal watercolour during this time, and it’s brilliant- I feel able to get far more texture and colour into my work than I ever could before. Similarly, after years of admiring pyrography but never trying it myself, I was kindly bought a set of wooden discs and a pyro-pen to play with for my birthday back in February.  I wanted to explore pyrography  within the theme of “Wild Coast” for the exhibition as well, using some of the same creatures from the occasion cards- a perfect medium to illustrate the rugged perseverance of animals existing in harsh coastal climates.

Pyrographed sea creatures (low res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration .jpg
© 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration – First steps in pyrography!

The pen I’ve been using is an Antex Craft pen, which is suitable for pyrography as well as fabric distressing, wax artwork, embellishment and (even!) as a mini iron!  There are many different tips for all these purposes that you can easily attach and detach- quite a few of which are varying nib-sized pen shapes. In the box, along with the tool and nibs, you receive a little stand to protect your work surfaces as the hot metal cools down.

(I’ve only touched upon what this tool can achieve in terms of pyrography so far, and haven’t even begun to explore its other abilities yet!)

To work with, as you might expect, it’s just like a pen- but your drawings are permanently etched into the surface of whatever you’re working on. The small wooden slices I received to practice on (as far as I can tell) are slightly sanded, but their natural grain still runs in rings out towards the edges. This grain looks very pretty and adds a nice extra bit of texture to the finished drawing, but if you’re used to working on smooth paper it’s definitely something to get used to- the pyro-pen likes to try and follow each of the rings, so if your design cuts across them it can be difficult to keep it on track!

I found it easier to try and work WITH the grain than against it- taking a look at any one disc before starting, you might see places where certain lines of your drawing can combine with the natural pattern of the wood. However, I found quite a lot of what I wanted to achieve forced me to cut across this grain, and after experimenting a little I found that:  a) drawing out your design first, with quite a hard pencil, can help form another natural channel for your pen to follow, and b) using dots to make up lines can flow better than trying to draw one continuous line!

I can show you an example of what I mean in point b) with this particular seal design:

Seal pyrography crop (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
© 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration- Pyro-seal!

The shading on his belly, as you might be able to see, was achieved with a sort of dotted, stippled effect of quick dabs with the pyro-pen- which ended up giving him a sort of mottled, freckly look!

I’ve only had positive experiences with this tool so far- it heats up quickly, has two different settings of heat for different depths of shading, and has produced some really lovely results! The next step is to work onto a larger piece of wood, and draw more of a composition than one single design…

Even if it doesn’t feel like it in your day-to-day grind, you’re always developing, evolving and improving… So just go for it, and don’t give up!

(P.S. The little mouse mentioned in the previous post is now running wild back in the fields of Wales, after a winter season of building his strength back up!)

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

Inktober 2016- Personalities of British Wildlife!

Good evening, lovely readers!

I’m delighted to announce that, for the first year since attempting the challenge, I have successfully completed Inktober!

For those of you who have never heard of it, Inktober is a simple concept- one sketch or artwork must be completed for every day of October, in an ink based medium… Whether it be an inky painting or even just a biro sketch, the whole idea is to keep up artistic momentum throughout the month, and to perhaps take the opportunity to dabble in a new medium. Inktober is called a challenge for a reason, though- it’s tricky to do a drawing every day on top of everything else that’s going on in life, particularly one that you’re proud of and happy to share with the world! I’ve struggled in the past but this year I was adamant that I would finish the challenge, with 31 drawings I was really happy with.

After going to an exhibition of Quentin Blake’s work earlier this year in Cardiff Museum, it’s been at the back of my mind to try working with bottled ink and a scratchy pen again. When I was younger I was very interested in calligraphy, receiving a small kit as a birthday present with a fine-nibbed fancy pen, different coloured bottled inks and smooth parchment paper. As I was searching for materials to use in this challenge, I came across them again at the back of my shelf, and decided it was high time for them to shine once more!

I think that part of the reason that I’ve struggled in the past is because I was always trying to think of a separate theme every day- after a couple of weeks, to keep spewing out an entire concept from scratch every day, AND complete all the other work I wanted and needed to get done, AND keep up with everything else always got a little too much for me to handle, so I would abandon the challenge.

This year, I decided on a different approach to make it work- to decide on, and stick to one theme that could run throughout, to transform it into a project I was really immersed in. Those who have followed my work over time will recognise my passion for nature and natural history, (many of my more recent characters and projects centring around animals) and I was very keen for this challenge to follow suit. In the end, I decided to spend this October exploring the characters of our best-loved British wildlife; my favourites can be found below! (The full 31 drawing-long shebang can be found here, in the album of “Inktober 2016”.)

Inktober Day 1 - Fat Robin signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day One- I tried to make sure that this exercise was never just about drawing a robin, instead I would try to truly see a robin for all it is- for its symbolism and significance, its character and personality in the grand scheme of our wonderful wildlife.
Inktober Day 2- Hedgehog signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Two- The hedgehog’s spikes were by far my favourite thing about this sketch- the scratchy pen I had on hand lent itself well to lots of quick little marks.
Inktober Day 5- Three British Owls signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Five- A trio of the wisest birds in the land. Their eyes always give the impression that they’ve seen everything.
Inktober Day 7- A Quartet of Edible mushrooms signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Seven- A little part of me danced for joy sketching this one… I’ve always had a huge interest in plants and fungi, maybe because when I was smaller I wanted to become a witch who made fancy brews from weird and wonderful ingredients. Either that, or a knight. Or a pirate.  I would have been happy with any of the above. Here are a collection of four edible mushrooms.
Day 14- Common Frog signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Fourteen- I’ve always struggled a little more with smooth-skinned creatures, as the lines you need to create a smooth as opposed to a furry body have to be a lot more clear and decisive. That said, I really enjoyed drawing these Common Frogs, and loved drawing in more fluid lines.
Day 17- Grey Seal Pup signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Ilustration.jpg
Day Seventeen- Grey Seal Pups. Cheeky, playful, stuffed full of charm and character- look at those liquid eyes! I remembered a particular video I once saw while drawing these little chaps which featured a seal in Ireland waiting patiently outside a fish and chip shop for an offering while completely blocking the road up.
Day 20- Badger signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Twenty- I’ve always loved the shambling way that badgers walk, not to mention their beautiful facial markings. I remember reading a story as a young child about how the badger got his stripes… He was marked as a thief with two blacks stripes after stealing a swan’s white feathers to fix his stained coat. On the contrary, badgers are usually depicted as more shy, kind creatures in most of our folk tales and popular fiction, a character which I preferred to coax out of this drawing.
Day 22- Shrewd signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Twenty-two. Shrewd. Shrewsbury. Shrewish. How-do-you-shrew. Pleasingly round, comical creatures, deceptively vicious. Solely carnivores too, apparently.

After this challenge had just ended, I had another opportunity to study the character of some Great British wildlife in the flesh, when I had the exciting privilege to meet a young wood mouse. My partner’s father is a talented photographer who also delights in natural subjects, and he had come across this young mouse one rainy, cold evening thinking it was dead… When he noticed it breathing, however, he brought it inside to the vivarium he often photographs caterpillars in to keep it warm and safe while it recovered (and take some pictures, of course!) He was convinced it was fairly young as it was very tame, and more inquisitive than anxious about human presence. A once in a lifetime opportunity for drawing- I was sat only inches away from the little creature as it gazed at me through huge, blackberry pip eyes. After a couple of trips back to its little nest of dry leaves to squiggle around, the mouse sat so still I was able to do a full colour sketch on the spot… In fact, it was so relaxed that it started to fall asleep!

Frankie Mouse © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
First introduction- little mouse comes to say hello! It was fascinating to watch its quick, decisive movements, and see how fast it breathes- it’s easy to forget that a mouse’s life is lived at twice, even three or four times the speed of ours… We must seem so lumbering and slow to them!
Frankie Mouse Sketchbook Page 2 © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
At one point, little mouse returned to its nest of dry leaves to peep out at me, leaving one large ear poking out of the gaps.
Frankie Mouse sketch sheet 3 © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Little mouse stayed still for so long in the end that I managed to draw a full colour sketch in addition to lots of movement studies. A fine life model indeed!

You never know where you’ll find your next little source of inspiration, never shut your eyes or ears to the possibilities!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A heart full of spark: On Ireland, Wales and a new exhibition!

It comes to pass in many young children’s lives where they begin to leave art behind. It won’t take more than a few years before many of them will begin to say, “Oh, I can’t draw. I wish I could, but I can’t.” Their imagination no longer lines up with their perception of reality, and slowly they cease to draw or paint for fear of “getting it wrong”.

Interestingly, a lot of accomplished artists actually break down and strip away a lot of what they create to reveal the real essence of their subject, to get the heart of the work right before embellishment is added. We’ve all experienced the desperation of wondering why artwork we’ve spent hours on “doesn’t look right”… I suppose, “over-working” artwork can occur when you add too many layers that stifle the life out of a piece of work, accidentally extinguishing the little bonfire of excitement that pushed you to create it in the first place. Perhaps this is why it’s so interesting to see the sketchbooks of our favourite artists- they are books constructed from little sparks of excitement, raw glimpses into the mind of a person. Since it’s been a while since I wrote a post, I thought I’d describe the last couple of months by way of a series of these little moments!

Back in July, some friends and I went to Dublin for the first time to see an exhibition all about the production of one of my favourite animated films, “The Song of the Sea”. We got to meet and chat to one of the very lovely animators who had worked on the film as well as seeing their process from concept to final product! (Below are some of my own photos taken at the exhibition, as well as some stills from the finished film.)

Ben and Cú Song of the Sea Exhibition.jpg
Ben and Cú concept art- Song of the Sea exhibition, Dublin
Saoirse and Bronach concept art Song of the Sea show.jpg
Saoirse and Bronach concept art- Song of the Sea exhibition, Dublin
Song of the Sea still for Blog Post October 2016.png
Still from Cartoon Saloon’s Song of the Sea– Saoirse and Ben’s Island
Cu-Ben-beach for Blog Post October 2016.jpg
Still from Cartoon Saloon’s Song of the Sea – Cú and Ben
Song of the Sea still for Blog Post October 2016.jpg
Still from Cartoon Saloon’s Song of the Sea- Macha’s House

From sketches right through to final animation, this film bursts with life and energy. The shapes and structures are wonderfully simple (the stormy skies in one scene come from the process of letting wet ink bleed across a page) but so beautifully detailed and embellished. Its heart and soul is Irish through and through, and draws many of its narrative elements from Irish folklore (particularly the legend of the Selkie.) Could this mean that energy and essence are easier retained through the artwork process when a story is at its core?

As well as the Song of the Sea exhibition, during our stay in Dublin we visited the Leprechaun museum (also known to some as the Irish Folklore museum, but as our guide pointed out, the word ‘Leprechaun’ draws in more overseas travellers than the word “Folklore” would.) We went for the evening show, which meant we got all the scarier stories they’re not allowed to tell in the day for fear of scaring the children… They do a podcast now too, around a new story per month, which is brilliant to listen to for inspiration or to help you relax. (You can find that here if you’re curious!)  The storytellers are truly talented people, and really whisk you up into their tales- I’ve started compiling my own written notebook of the stories I’ve learnt, for later reference (avid readers will know how much I love illustrating a good folk tale!)

I go back quite a lot to visit my friends and significant other in Wales for weekend adventures- joined by my sketchbook, of course! I had a bit of fun sketching the chickens belonging to my other half’s parents back in the summer, although I do have a bit of a rocky past with one in particular…  Let’s just say, when she didn’t want to get back into the barn with her friends, I attempted to assert myself in herding her back inside, while she remained not the least bit bothered or affected by what I was trying to achieve. This fact aside, she and her friends made some excellent life models!

chickens-sketches
“Chillin'” © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration
Chicken sketches © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration copy.jpg
“Home” – sketch © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration

I had an exciting adventure to a certain “Culver’s Cove” back in August, an an old favourite spot for smugglers around the Welsh coastlines. The most frequent visitors now seem to be seabirds, but even that is pretty exciting- any slight noise and the sky is filled with startled shapes zipping overhead.

Culver's Cove sketch 1 © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg

The construction set within the cliff face seems more organic than man-made, save for these three little windows carved out of the face, smuggler’s spy-holes, I bet.

All of these little moments over this year have paved the way for the most recent show I participated in. I’ve been meeting with a few local artists to help plan this event for a while now, as round where we are there isn’t that much in the way of easily accessible art- there’s plenty of artists, but with the exception of a bi-annual county-wide arts trail, there’s not much that can tie us all together. That’s exactly what we wanted to change, and bring all of these talented people out of their homes and studios, to put more of their work into the public eye, and bring more of a sense of unity and community to our little spot in the world. Everyone was very happy with how the event turned out- we all managed to sell some work and make some new contacts, and our wonderful hosts, a volunteer-run, coastal view cafe, were thrilled with the buzz we managed to create outside of the normal season. A fantastic week all round!

Lido Show.jpg
My spot at the Lido Exhibition! (Prints, greetings cards and original paintings!) © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration

After digesting an audiobook of George Orwell’s 1984 and a new TV series this week (while combating a particularly nasty cold) I can’t help but think upon the importance of the little quirks and personalities that each and every person has. Keeping a sketchbook, drawing and painting allows me to express more of myself than I ever could with words: much like Winston Smith in 1984, the process of recording in books your thoughts and feelings, however they come out, is a record of your individuality that cannot be denied.

After all, we are all human. We are scared, vulnerable, joyful, unpredictable, and full of love; and for many of us, art is one of the things that will enable us never to forget that.

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Quietly confident: Powers of Silent Picture Books

Hello lovely readers!

It’s been a busy couple of months; I attended the Bologna Bookfair with a friend at the start of April so a lot of my time went into getting work ready to take there! It was a fantastic experience, and also the first time I’ve been since I was a student- second year me would have been very proud (possibly even disbelieving!) to see me march up and speak to lots of different people about my work… It’s still scary, but I get such a buzz from it now! I’ve sent off one selection of samples already, here’s hoping for some exciting new opportunities and projects to work on!

As my friend and I made some time to poke about in Bologna while we were staying this time, we managed to see a lot more ordinary Italian life passing by when we were eating and not running for trains… We discovered, much to our delight, that the pet of choice in Bologna most definitely seems to be of the canine variety. If you’ve ever seen the introduction sequence of Disney’s 101 Dalmatians with all the dogs that match their owners, you’ll get an idea of what it was like wandering about in Bologna’s streets!

Of course, we took lots of photos, and took some time to draw… On the way to the Bookfair one morning, we paused at one particular shop (an odd mix of a wine bar, deli and newsagents) to have a sandwich, when an elderly man with two of the fattest, wobbliest bassett hounds I’ve ever seen came trundling around the corner. The man walked in to get a lunchtime glass of wine, leaving the dogs outside to almost immediately fall asleep, their folds and wrinkles spreading out across the pavements like melting icecream.

Fat Bassett signed.jpg
Bologna Bassetts!

 

Capturing these many glorious pooches in particular moments of their day to day life resonated with one of my favourite parts of the Bologna Bookfair- The IBBY Silent Book Exhibition. This is the place where this year’s shortlisted silent book concepts are gathered together and displayed! (To view a full list of the finalists, you can visit this link! You’ll see what I mean by “Silent”- these picture book concepts contain no text whatsoever, their stories are told entirely in their illustrations.)

Some of you loyal readers might remember that I work part of my week as a nursery assistant, and a huge part of my time there is spent reading books to the children. (It’s great, because I can get a lot more primary research into what imagery they are drawn to!) I wanted to learn more about silent books: not only for my illustration work, but for inspiration about how I could introduce silent books to the children I see every week, and how I could better aid their developing literacy skills.

Here are just some of the positive and sometimes surprising outcomes I read about when silent books are included as part of learning programmes:

  • Nursery practitioners found that both themselves and their children could use the images in silent books as talking points, to promote and develop vocabulary, creative language and storytelling skills. Silent picture books also helped younger children to grasp the natural sequencing we take for granted in books: beginnings, middles and ends, left to right pagination, and what might happen next.
  • Teachers and nursery practitioners found that since silent or wordless picture books had no “page-turning cues” from the text, they would spend longer talking about each page with children. This gave themselves and the children they worked with longer to pore over the images, and find much, much more detail in them than they might have done had the stories been accompanied by words. (Of course, these principles can work on worded picture books too! Words or none, young children will always alert you to interesting parts of the imagery which you can use as further discussion cues! This may also be helpful for less confident adult readers as the story then becomes less of a performance and more of an informal chat.)
  • Teachers and nursery practitioners also found that children enjoyed silent picture books when still on the cusp of being able to read to themselves: being able to read the books from cover to cover on their own without missing any information helped them to grow into more confident, enthusiastic story-devourers!
  • Silent books are being used as tools to aid refugee children during the current crisis to adjust to a new life abroad. Lampedusa, one of the Italian Pelagie islands in the Mediterranean, has a large collection of silent books in its central (and first!) library with local and immigrant children in mind, courtesy of IBBY’s 2012-13 project, “Final Destination Lampedusa”.   (Take a look at the full report here)
  • In terms of higher level learning, for example at Foundation Diploma or degree level Illustration courses, the creation of silent narratives is a process teaching staff often like to include in the programme to help to build storytelling and narrative skills in young artists.

 

It’s been an idea I’ve been toying with for some time now, but after all this wonderful inspiration, I’ve decided to enter the silent book contest next year! I’m still narrowing down concepts: one possibility is to use my title little chap from”A Bear’s Winter” in a visual tale of his journey…

Bear narrative for blog.jpg
“A Bear’s Winter” storyboard-style layout, featured in my Bologna portfolio this year!

 

Rest assured, whichever I develop, it will involve a featured animal character- bear, dog or seal!

That’s it for this post- next time will be an update about how my silent book project is progressing, with a little feature on painted textures and patterns, with reference to “The Song of the Sea” film by Cartoon Saloon! Keep your eyes peeled over the coming weeks for big changes to my portfolios too… There’s a lot of new work to be added!

As always, thankyou for taking the time to visit my blog, I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I do writing it!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A New Years Bears’ Bearing

I remember the relief I felt one day at university when our tutor told us that even the best artists cannot work without reference. It’s tempting sometimes, particularly if you’ve drawn something before, to look at it with a foppish wave of your hand and exclaim, “I can illustrate that, I know how it works.”

This can be a bit of a trap your mind sets for you: because you’ve seen a bird fly over your head thousands of times, you might think, “I know how to draw that, I don’t need any reference images to help.” But as soon as you try to replicate it, to draw or paint it yourself without something to refer to as a decent final artwork, you find the solid idea of that bird falls apart like a wet cake into different bits you remember, but may struggle to fit together as a whole. This can be incredibly frustrating to a person at any point in their artistic career, and can cause the throwing of pencils and other drawing materials across the room.

Those who read my blog regularly will remember in my last post my mentioning of a personal project I’ve been dedicating time to each week involving bears. I used to find drawing bears quite difficult- they are heavy, but since a lot of the weight that is visible is topped off with fur, it’s sometimes hard to tell where movement comes from, particularly from a static image. (I’ll confess, part of the reason I chose the characters for this project was down to the fact that I found bears a challenge.)

Of course, the best way to study movement is in real life, but unless I were to visit a zoo (where movement could easily be restricted due to lack of space) or go somewhere where bears exist naturally, it may be a little tricky. Certain places in Sweden have “hides” where photographers/artists can go to study bears without disturbing them- something I’d love to do, but it wouldn’t be that easy for me to just pop over there of an afternoon.

I’ve found that a fantastic resource for this project so far has been studying animated bear characters.

For an animator to create a moving sequence they have to know everything about how that person or creature will move and express itself. An animator will have had to pick apart their subject to understand how it works, which is perfect when it comes to our research, as it presents us with a comprehensive cross-section of all the parts that make up this or that.

Vimeo had some brilliant examples of this- Guillaume Arantes, a Gobelins 3D animation student, produced a fantastic cycle that showed a bear’s walk from four different angles. Below is a screenshot of his animation with the site address for those who might want to find it!

(All rights for the original sequence below belong to Guillaume Arantes.)

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(All rights for the original sequence above belong to Guillaume Arantes.)

 

Pixar’s Brave also offered a large amount of inspiration in terms of creating two very different bear characters just by using different line weights and textures:

Brave-12.jpg
(All rights Pixar 2012)

My character development is still in progress, but here is an early drawn sequence of what the little lad might look like:

Bear cub falling asleep © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration .jpg
Sleep cycle – © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration

Lots of round shapes with short and soft features and fluffy fur achieved with a soft 3B pencil definitely helps to establish his youngness.

Bear Balloon Play.jpg
Bear and Balloon – © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration

Putting other objects in with the bear can help them come to life, as they appear to play before your eyes. Here Mama bear gently paws a balloon in the same way she might handle her cub.

I’ve approached their habitat in the same way, in terms of slowly picking it apart. A very good friend of mine lives in Norway and has been kind enough to keep me stocked with forest photos to study. Rocks, hideyholes, trees and paths have come under even more scrutiny than usual…

It’s a long process, but I love it!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Winter Fairs, First Frosts and The Grey People

Hello, and a Merry December to you all!

I’d like to start this post with a little story and observation that is particularly relevant at this time of year, I feel. When I was on the train a couple of weeks ago, returning from a trip to Hull during the wild weather, I was gratefully munching down my ham sandwich and peering out of the window at the ever-darkening landscapes flashing past. At every station, a handful of people would get on, wedging themselves into seats and cuddling in tight into their layers of clothing to try and thaw from the chill wind. Evidently, they were cold, and tired, and just wanted to get home- I understand. But a couple of them seemed to be saturated in this grey cloud, staring through my smiles and nods of acknowledgement and away again.

I’ve experienced this before, a few times, with a few characters really standing out in my memory as totally “grey” – one man I encountered on the bus a few months ago being the example that my memory will always jump to. He was the sort of character you just wanted to go and hug, and tell him that everything was going to be okay- life seemed to have sucked all the colour and joy from his bones, leaving his eyes dull and his mouth downturned. At this time of year, I always think of one of my very favourite stories of all time, “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens, and its main character, Ebenezer Scrooge. I always couldn’t help but feel sorry for the greedy old miser described in the tale. I remember a feeling of curiosity rather than despair or hatred the first time I heard the story: he was cold and unfeeling, yes, but why? I would wager that through the given descriptions of his youth, loneliness would be one of the largest reasons for Scrooge intially finding solace in his money and business, which would later cut him off from his peers, and also his heart.

Now, by no means will I, or can I, ever pass judgement on strangers I meet in the street- every soul has a thousand unspoken problems and worries that may glaze their eyes and leave them lost and unsure, and a little grey around the edges. We will all experience a period of this greyness, where life seems dull, repetitive and not heading in the direction we’d hoped. Money will be a worry for all of us at some point too, unless you’re incredibly lucky. But, I have realised, my greatest fear is that this will creep slowly, irreversibly into a heart and strip a person of all their character, all their passion and loves in life, until they lose all their colour permanently. People remember Scrooge for his tightfistedness, but I remember him for his indifference- his withered soul devoid of love for anything or anyone.

This Christmas, please help me in my main life’s aim- to prevent the onset of “total greyness” in everybody you encounter, including strangers. Please smile, be kind and generous in spirit- and you can help keep hearts warm, and the world more loved.

On that note, I’m overjoyed to announce that I’m currently still adding to a catalogue of greetings cards for “Thortful”, a new web-based “marketplace” which will officially launch in the New Year, which centres around a philosophy of making people happy- both creators and customers!

My cards will finally be available online!! They’re all animal-based, as with a great proportion of my work this year! The site is now live before its official launch, if you’d like a sneaky peek please follow this link to view my current collection!

In my last post, I mentioned a Christmas Fair I was participating in on the 5th of December. I’m pleased to say that it was a success- a step up from last year, and I received lots of lovely comments and compliments as well as making a fair few sales! Here’s some of the highlights in pictures:

5-12-15 Greetings cards photoPrince of Snow at craft fair5:12:15 Christmas Fair Stall Photo

As you can see from some of these images, bears have kept cropping up throughout my practice for a good while now. Any of you that look at my Facebook site as well as this blog will have seen a specific album dedicated to this study, which contains a few snippets of a personal project I’m working on (and one I am determined will be published!) My next post in January will contain a few little teasers of artwork that have been developing my ideas, as well as a short writeup of my influences so far.

I think all that remains is for me to wish you all a very Merry Christmas (and a God Jul to all of my Norwegian friends celebrating today!) – spend these special days with all your dearest ones, laughing and making merry. Presence will always trump presents, after all.

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.