Category Archives: Creative

The power of words- and the vessels to hold them. (The stories behind my top 10 greetings card designs!)

This year has forced an odd paradox. Meaningful human connection, necessary for us to function properly, has only been recommended to occur from a distance. This is a bittersweet contradiction in itself- where words and technology are our normally our tools to enhance our powers of connection, they have had to do as a replacement for many of our day-to-day physical expressions of love. If it weren’t for my lovely partner keeping my hug-o-meter going all by himself, I probably would have struggled even more than I did.

But, perhaps because of this, the act of using words to communicate and to document has felt even more powerful this year. I’ve felt like I’ve got a little more practice at expressing myself honestly- not just in the ways that I feel people want to hear. To paraphrase a really good friend in a heart-to-heart over the phone the other day- when your world becomes contained within four walls, there is no space to hide from the things that scare you anymore- and when this happens, you have to face them in the best way you know how.

I’m just coming to the end of a short writing course, called “The Winter Writing Sanctuary”, taught by the inspirational Beth Kempton. (Any of you word lovers, PLEASE jump in and take this course if you can- it’s so freeing, supportive, and fun!) Over the past two weeks, I’ve really challenged myself- to write every day, to approach each of the prompts openly and fully, to share my work even though its scary. As I’ve begun to realise more than ever before that one of my life’s dreams is not only to illustrate, but WRITE my own children’s books as well, it has been a wonderful way to enjoy writing for fun again – and allow ideas to bubble up without putting too much pressure on them as they’re trying to get out! I’m realising that I really love writing with a gentle undertone of comedy- which makes perfect sense really, as there is nothing I like more than making people laugh! (This will be the focus for my next post, my last before Christmas!)

I treated myself to a new notebook for this course which got me thinking about where we like to keep our words, to keep them safely locked away for ourselves or for others. What vessels do we use to store them? Some feel pretty permanent- like books or letters (which may be why it sometimes feels so daunting to put the first words into them, because we want them to feel like something precious!) – while we know that others may not stick around for ever- they may be more fleeting expressions of our feelings at the time.

I’ve always loved sending physical post to people as a way to remind them that I’m thinking of them. I loved exchanging letters with an old school friend back throughout April and May- she is an awesome writer, I smiled at the pictures she conjured of walks in the sunshine and precious time spent on new hobbies (the alchemy of dehydrating foods and making Himalayan Balsam gin) and imagined a similar sunny day where I could hug her again, and join in with these adventures!

This year (even more than those that have passed, although it’s a ritual I really enjoy) I want to prioritise writing Christmas cards. They are, after all, mini presents made up of well wishes- and I know that the people that I reach out to will appreciate the thought!

In this seasonal special blog post I’m going to be talking a little bit about the stories behind 10 of the Christmas card illustrations I’m most proud of- as well as links to where to buy them, if you so wish!

A couple of notes about these links, and the places that I currently sell my greetings cards, before we begin:

-Thortful is an online greetings card marketplace- artists can upload their designs, Thortful handles the production costs, and royalties come when people buy your cards! (To see my profile, take a look here!

-My shop is a new venture I launched last year- a place to continue the good work that I do at art shows and exhibitions; to sell the work I have developed as products (greetings cards, mugs, coasters, etc.) I order stock, package and post myself! To visit and browse, click “shop” in the menu bar above, or click here!

As the copyright for the designs on Thortful remains with me (they don’t own an exclusive license to any of the work) there is some cross-over with the greetings cards I sell through both of these platforms. Since the pandemic hit I’ve been grateful to have both in existence: I have had the best year on Thortful sales-wise since starting in 2016, and I have been gearing my promotion more towards that platform to reduce the time I spend at the post office over the past months. However, after exploring some more creative ways of getting post out, I’ll be pushing my own shop more next year!

TOP TEN FAVOURITES: CHRISTMAS CARDS TO CELEBRATE WINTER!

“Winter Balloon” – © Carina Roberts Illustration

Believe it or not, winter is one of my favourite seasons. Yes it can be bleak, depressing and sharply poignant at times, but it can also be the most beautiful season, with the sun low in the sky and a hollow, cold quality to the air- particularly when it snows. I love how your breath plumes out in front of you like a dragon’s, the sprinkling of frost on a morning walk, the bluish tint to hillsides on a cold day. When I was planning ideas for “Winter Balloon”, I was inspired by the Gordano Valley where I grew up, the fields that I used to be able to see from some of my school classrooms where I would daydream: imagining striding out to explore like an adventurer.

Where to buy? This design can be bought direct from my shop!

“Winter Woollies”- © Carina Roberts Illustration

Robins are one of the most loved symbols of winter and Christmas here in the the UK. They’re just irresistible – to admire outside among stark branches while dressed up snugly, or encapsulated within a greetings card- round, bouncy, fluffed out and bright. The story goes that our association with these charming little fellows began in the 1800s with the creation of the postal service, and the red uniforms that were issued for staff: later nicknamed “robins” (could this also be linked to the phrase, “round robin”?)

Our nearby woods and green spaces have been indispensable to me this year as I’ve focused on taking delight at the small pleasures of life. Catching a glimpse of these little birds reminds me of the famous individual we had turn up every Forest School snack time to hoover up the crumbs – looking back at this design which I created in 2016 now feels like a happy memory of simpler times (and maybe even a symbol of hope for the future!)

Where to buy? This design can found for sale on my Thortful site, or direct from me at my shop.

“BOK-ing around the Christmas Tree” © 2020 Carina Roberts Illustration

Last year, I was coming up with some new ideas for a Christmas collection, based on animals. After spending a weekend in early November 2019 with my partner at his parents’ farm and palling around with their chickens again, I knew I had to include them somehow.

I love helping with the daily care of these feathered members of the extended family! Opening their coop in the morning, mischief at dusk when one decides it’s not bedtime when tucking them in – it’s a joy to watch their jerky, dinosaur-like movements whatever they’re up to, especially when they dash madly after whoever they think may be the keeper of food. This was around the time that I first started considering intentionally including more of my sense of humour in the artwork I make, as I started exploring ways that a greedy hen might get to their Christmas feast quicker.

Where to buy? This design can be found for sale on my Thortful site until the 31st of December 2020. After that, it’ll only be available direct from me. (I’ll talk more about why a little later on!)

“Prince of Snow”
“Inuit Bear”
“Polar Bear Closeup”

Seeing the work of Raymond Briggs in a whole new light after studying “When the Wind Blows” for my university dissertation (and buying “The Tin Pot Foreign General and the Old Iron Woman” for my Dad the Christmas before last) I have plunged into as many of his books as I have been able to over the past few years- revisiting old favourites and discovering new ones.

“The Bear” is definitely one of these new favourites- after reading the book (and watching the film adaptation) I produced a flurry of work inspired by polar bears, choosing to focus on their soft and gentle side (their proud features, the smooth slopes of their snowy heads) in the three designs above.

Where to buy? “Prince of Snow”: This design can found for sale on my Thortful site, or direct from me at my shop.

“Inuit Bear”: This design can be bought direct from my shop!

“Polar Bear Close-up”: This design can also be bought direct from my shop!

“Hibernation”
“Cosy and Warm”

Another huge plus for winter in my book is the COSINESS! I love a pair of fluffy socks, a woolly jumper, a warm blanket- I love snuggling up in the one my Mum knitted me a couple of years ago on a cold winter’s night.

It feels like something really innate, this desire to snuggle up during the coldest, darkest months. Lots of animals hibernate, gathering up all the cosiest materials they can find to get ready for a long sleep- and looking incredibly cute to our human eyes when they do. It can be difficult to get a good glimpse at this when they’re out in the wild- but I’ve been lucky enough to make some drawings of similar mice from life on a couple of occasions. For both of these designs, I really tried to imagine how these tiny creatures were feeling, ensconced in their carefully crafted nests after a winter feast.

Where to buy? “Hibernation” – This design can found for sale on my Thortful site, or direct from me at my shop (while stocks last- it is one of my most popular cards!)

“Cosy and Warm” – This design can found for sale on my Thortful site.

“Have a Quacking Christmas”

When I first moved into my current house last September, I wanted to get to know my surroundings properly: not just as somewhere to see in passing, (as I had been doing every time I came to visit my partner) but as a home.

There’s a community farm very close by that I visited a couple of times during this period, in order to get some inspiration and ideas for a new Christmas collection (“A Christmas Farmyard”, the same group of greetings cards “BOK-ing Around the Christmas Tree” was designed for.) I had taken an interest in geese after playing the “Untitled Goose Game” through Steam (it’s hilarious, if any of you like video games and a bit of bird-related humour I’d definitely recommend it!) I was delighted to find a variety of honking as well as quacking species waddling around their site- based on my observations of their movements and beautiful markings, I began the development work for the raucous party of ducks you see above. (I look forward to when we can party this hard again!)

Where to buy? This design is currently available on my Thortful site, and after the 31st of December, (ie. ready for next Christmas) direct from me at my shop. I am still working on adding to the “Christmas farmyard” collection- who knows who else might be joining them next year!

“Horatio’s Hindrance”

Decorating for Christmas has always been one of my favourite parts of winter- twinkling lights that make your everyday living space feel magical; a tree dotted with memories of years past, captured fleeting moments. Both me and my brother have looked on in disbelief at some of the things my Mum and Dad have continued to put out on the tree year after year- some as prehistoric as our wonky school cross-stitch attempts. There is a clear message that flows out of these choices, warming the house from the inside out: “We choose to have these Christmas Crafts on show- because you were proud of them. They were presents, your most precious treasures gifted to us- love is in each and every one, and that is worth something.”

I’ve really missed working with children face to face this year, and have thought a lot about my wonderful nursery friends over the past months. I was lucky enough to work with the most supportive, lovely groups of adult and children, in the most caring environment – and in a similar vein, the run up to our Christmas was celebrated with makes, as well as decorating the building. There was always a buzz of excitement, and the same glow of pride in our work as there had been at home when I was small – a world of exploration, without the fear of mess. (After all, a bit of mess just shows you’ve been learning and having fun!)

Designing “Horatio’s Hindrance”, I wanted to capture a little spark of this feeling- that some of life’s beauty lies in the imperfections- the beautiful chaos of Christmas craft.

Where to buy? This design can be bought direct from me at my shop. It has also become my third best seller EVER this year on my Thortful site, and will be available in its current format until the 31st of December 2020.

I say in “its current format” – as I touched on briefly earlier, there are some changes coming to Thortful on the 31st of December. After this date, they will only be accepting portrait orientation card designs on their website- any landscape cards will be deleted from artist profiles. “Horatio’s Hindrance” will be returning, but rejigged to fit this new specification, while I have plans brewing of how to build on “Bok-ing Around the Christmas Tree” and “A Quacking Christmas” and put up two new designs, still part of my “Christmas Farmyard” collection. I will still be ordering new physical stock of the cards no longer on Thortful though, for sale direct through my shop (and at face-to-face events, when I can celebrate doing those again!)

x x x

I hope there’s some inspiration here to capture those words bouncing around your head and funnel them out into or onto something- private or to be read by someone you know will love them! Fill your home with wonderful words!

As I previously mentioned, next time I’ll be talking a bit about humour and how I use it in my work. My delight at the simple things in life is something that has become apparent to me while completing the aforementioned writing course. The work I have the most fun making always has an element of gentle humour – it’s something I’d love to focus on more next year.

So, in the hope of inviting a better 2021, this will be my focus for the last blog post of the year! See you soon!

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A catchup, and what’s coming up!

Hello jolly sailors!

Yet again, it’s been a little while- hasn’t it been a summer and a half!? Not only have I been busy, probably like you I’ve been battling the sizzlingly un-sportsmanly temperatures that have been beating down from above throughout June and July. With cool breezes arriving just in time for the school holidays, I can finally breathe again- and update you on what I’ve been up to!

Back in May myself and my partner went to Malta to celebrate the wedding of two friends (and to acclimatise ourselves to the 30 degree heat!) It was absolutely gorgeous there and we had so much fun catching up with lots of our friends who live spread out across the globe!

Malta cove - Aug18.jpg
A Malta Cove – at the very beginning of our trek over the clifftops from Xlendi to San Lawrenz (home of the tragically collapsed Azure Window) – I still can’t get over the shade of this water!

On one beach we spotted some funny little fish popping their heads out of the holes in the rocks as the waves broke over them!

Being surrounded by water for most of this trip inspired me to start thinking about the SWLA annual “Natural Eye” exhibition again- it’s something I missed last year, but was at the top of my “to-do” list for this year. I know I can be pretty bad for shying away from big competitions, but since I was long-listed for the Templar Illustration competition in April I thought I’d give it a go!

After exploring three or so separate avenues I could go down for this project, I chose to circle back to seals as my muses (they seem to have crept into most of my other work over the past year or so!) My partner, along with his parents and I were planning a trip to Skomer anyway so I thought I could get some serious research done there (and have a proper go with some most excellent binoculars I was kindly bought for Christmas!)

Sadly, despite our early arrival, (we left the house at 4:30AM!) balmy conditions and fair shipping forecast, an ill wind was set to blow up in the afternoon so the boats were cancelled- it wouldn’t have been safe to get back, so they said. (I’m not upset, honest- even though it was our last chance to see the puffins this year!) We did see some seagulls through the binoculars- not really the same, but they worked very well!

This means I did have to turn to different sources to research seals on this occasion – below are some of my development sketches from working towards the final composition!

^ Exploration of on-shore behaviours of seals- interactions with friends and family! This would form the core inspiration for the final artwork.

Seals progress v2© 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
Colour test, and playing with composition!

SWLA seals - final design progress v2
Sketching out the final piece… Hello you chaps!

Haul-out (Final) - 72DPI
The final piece- “Haul-out”!

 

You might remember that at the start of the year I set myself the goal of exploring more varied lighting, tone and shapes within my artwork? You also might remember that I’ve been using a personal wordless picture book project (which I’ll eventually enter into the Bologna Silent Book comp!) to practice these principles (click here to read a previous post about this project!)

Well, coupled with the artistic motivation that comes from of a long weekend trip to Dublin I returned from yesterday, this project has come on in leaps and bounds! I’ve been delving into the various environments of the story, as well as using my research from the SWLA competition to explore a seal’s reaction to a human habitat… But more about that next time!

For now, enjoy the autumn breezes, and hope you don’t have too many sneezes!

P.S. I’m involved with a couple of shows over the next couple of months where I’ll be showcasing some of my artwork (dates and details below) – with the slow makeover of this blog I’m hoping to introduce a separate section of the website to show upcoming events in the next couple of weeks, so you don’t have to go trawling through posts to find them.

For now though, here is where you can come and visit me, and maybe buy something too!

Upcoming events 

Cafe Lido exhibition with Portishead Arts – 27th-30th September 2018 

(Cafe Lido, Esplanade Rd, Portishead, BS20 7HD)

Made in North Somerset Showcase – 14th October 2018 (10AM-4PM)

(Court house farm, Church Road South, Portishead BS20 6PU)

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The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

Shape and colour – rediscovering the palette knife!

Hello again, radiant readers!

It’s been a busy few months since my last post, and I have lots to share with you!

I’m so excited to announce that I was longlisted for the Templar Illustration Prize a few weeks ago… My name was officially listed within the top ten entries, which was such an incredible surprise! I unfortunately wasn’t selected in the final three shortlist, but I got so much further than I thought I would- it’s an amazing step for me as an illustrator!

A short snippet about that to begin with- it was a really interesting project to complete, we had to submit a cover design, storyboard to explore the book’s narrative and layout, and a completed artwork spread for a book about dragons aimed within the age bracket of 0-12 years. I learnt a lot during this project, and visited some pretty interesting places for research (one, a birthday trip to St. Fagan’s in Wales – to study and draw old buildings!)

"Cover" FINAL ( + text) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
The final draft cover of my dragon themed project for Templar’s 40 Year Illustration Competition- “The Island”. © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

 

Alongside what is becoming my signature painting style of gouache and coloured pencil (with a teeny bit of ink thrown in!) I explored (and revisited) lots of different mediums and techniques to decide how to create the final artworks for this project. Bleach and lemon juice into ink to produce botanical patterns, scraping and “rock rubbing” to create texture…

At the core of this exploration was the underlying principle to simplify all elements of the final artwork which weren’t the direct focus. For example, in the cover artwork depicted above, I spent days painting sea and waves to come up with a way to make them noticeable, but not so detailed that they would distract away from the dragon floating in the middle. I needed a way to produce flowing, swirling water which could look different every time I painted it, a technique with a little bit of a mind of its own…

Then I rediscovered my Grandma’s trusty old palette knife.

I haven’t used a palette knife since the second year of university during a life-drawing lesson with oils, but I thought I’d give it a go for this project.

Painting stripes of pure colour onto the palette knife and dragging it across the page produced some really interesting sketchbook studies, as well as scuffing back across dried blocks of colour to create waves. (Scuffing a little paint across a very finely-textured sketchbook page can give some really interesting textures too – as I’ll explore a little later on!)

Geometric Waves
Painting the sea! © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Something I’ve always shied away from when painting flowing or floaty objects without clear lines is using geometrical shapes to help build the final outcome. As the palette knife I was using has one long, tapered point, I thought I might break down some walls and attempt a rough sea constructed from triangles.

Triangular Waves
A close-up… © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

While it seemed a little alien to be be painting something which moves about so much in such a static way at first, the exercise of using triangles to create this ocean really helped me to build a sense of background and foreground, as well as liveliness in the waves. Blocking simple colour in like this allowed for more complicated processes over the top:

Little Red Boat - Top to Toe
Sample oceans to hold a little tugboat. © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Little Red Boat
© 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Little Red Boat v2
Stripes of colour applied to the palette knife, (darkest at the bottom, lightest at the top) placed on the page and dragged in a single diagonal movement from top left to bottom right really worked as a technique to create larger, more dramatic waves for the little boat to perch atop! © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

After this project was finished and sent off, I turned my head back to getting some Spring/Summer animal themed greetings cards designs ready for 2018. In a similar train of thought as when I was working on “The Island”, I wondered how I could use the palette knife to help bring new depth into my artwork.

SAMPLES OF EARTH

Again, the decision in using the palette knife to work out a backdrop in these greetings cards was to lend more sharpness to the foreground focus- be it animal, mineral or vegetable- equally adding some context to the main attention of the artwork, in this case a mole burrowing.

In the development stage of this particular design I used similar dragging techniques as I had when exploring the water in “The Island”, as well as loading up the palette knife with mixed colours to dab and scrape over pre-dried layers, to create bobbles, lumps and lines, as you would find in real earth.

Earth sample 1 (smaller file)

Earth sample v2 (Smaller file)

Earth Sample 4 (Smaller file)
Scraping the first layer of dark colour across the clean page at the bottom seemed to help accentuate the dandelion roots!! © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Next, came the moles, happy burrowing in Spring through the damp earth for the juiciest earthworms!

Mole selection
Using a paintbrush for the foremost element of the design, the main character, helped to keep the outlines clean- as well as brighter colours, cementing him the focus of the whole shebang.     © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

Little mole spring blank v2 Mole sketch v3Little mole spring blank v1 Little mole spring blank v1.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Above are some snippets from next stage of the development for this design; some of the thumbnails from working on the final layout. The palette knife scrapes began to suggest the flinging of dirt as the mole speedily dug away his tunnel, placing him firmly in his own little story. If the mole had no backdrop here, he might look a little as though he was swimming or floating through space, but having that extra layer lets him reveal to the viewer a little piece of his life. (As my skill lies mainly in narrative illustration, you can see how it seeps into all of my other projects too!)

One thing I really want to attempt next is rust- as a side-note for my silent book project I’ve begun a small sketchbook on boats as research to support a couple of the spreads, so whenever I’m in a port or seaside town I’ll be a-scribbling, with particular interest in the older behemoths which are busy oxidising and gathering sealife!

My next post will be based around an AMAZING trip to Malta, (I arrived back yesterday!) – it’s given me some really interesting ideas for my SWLA (Society of Wildlife Artists) competition entry – another little something I’ve been meaning to do in the past, which I’m really knuckling down to enter this year!

Thanks for reading- hope you’re having a great time wherever you are, and continue to find a little inspiration in every day!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

Disruption and peace- A snow adventure!

Good evening, lovely ones!

As amber snow and ice warnings sweep the country for the second time this month, I thought it was time for an “emergency broadcast”, as it were, that interrupts my normal posting schedule.

Instead of this being a panicky message of impending doom, however, this is an excited short post about some serious inspiration that is going to open up a whole new way of keeping sketchbooks and conducting research for me which I wanted to share!

I was recently in one of my favourite places in the world to be- in a large bookshop, in a comfy seat, browsing through lots and lots of different books. I found a particularly special one which I couldn’t just leave behind…

It’s called “Explorers’ Sketchbooks: The Art of Discovery & Adventure” and features the notes, sketches and paintings of a great number of explorers, detailing the essence of what made their trips into the unknown so brilliant. There are drawings from explorers who sat dangerously close to volcanoes, sketching and painting their lava patterns; journals exploring whole civilisations previously undocumented, and flora and fauna from the first voyages to new lands (including some of the first ever drawings made on a deep sea dive!)

For a person like me, whose young self was frightened of so many things, this book would’ve been amazing when I was young- to transport me to places I never felt I could reach. Now, as I grow older, I love it even more; it reminds me how far I’ve come since then, how now I feel more confidence to seek out things which frighten me to conquer, as well as a colossal burst of inspiration for projects to seek out in the future.

It got me thinking; the whole concept of a explorer’s journal is a fantastic lesson for any illustrator or artist- drawing on location, especially in challenging conditions, reveals so much more than drawing retrospectively through photographs. It not only teaches you to be less precious about things that you put in your sketchbook, but forces you to make notes in a different way to how you normally might.

Taking inspiration from some of the explorers I’ve been reading about, I ventured out into the freezing conditions today for a short ‘expedition’, to draw in the blizzard-like conditions which have been storming about. The bitter chill of the wind forced me to keep my very thick gloves on, which made it a lot harder to get the range of movement in my hands which I’m used to. The cold acted as a great pressure not to care too much about getting things perfect, and just concentrate more on gesture and movement.

Snow Diary p1 (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
Hedge and hill and snowy tracks

Snow Diary p2 (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
Blasting snow flurries (top, middle) ; the old barn (bottom)

Snow Diary p3 (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
Brave figures venturing out in the midst of the cold!

Snow Diary 4 (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
Determined parent with some very excited children!

I’m not yet ready to settle on one subject to study for the rest of my life yet (like one particular animal or place), but the whole concept of exploring shown through the accounts of these incredible men and women opens up a world of new possibilities. As I near a deadline particularly important to me it was good for a moment just to step back for a few hours, look at things from a slightly new angle, and think dreamily about the great many things I’ve yet to study and understand in my artwork.

After all, even if it’s true that I now won’t be the first person up Everest, or under the sea- nobody will, or ever again see those things through my eyes. And that’s a little bit exciting.

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

Kernow- A visual diary!

Happy New Year all!

What a wild and stormy start to 2018! Here’s hoping you’re warm and dry, and haven’t been affected by the wind and rain too badly!

I wonder how many people out there started this year (or any new year!) feeling a little anxious? A whole 365 new days stretching out from here to what feels like eternity, full of expectations, resolutions and challenges- a certain desperation in feeling you HAVE to do something new and exciting this year while still fulfilling all of your previous commitments? I’m sure it’s most of us!

In the past feelings like this have overwhelmed me- there’s so much that I want to do, that I’ll take on too much at once, and feel bad because I didn’t finish everything I wanted to. Now, I’m trying my best every new year to think of something specific to focus on for the coming months in order to better my practice (and myself) to really target my weaknesses!

For example, I’ve never really liked drawing buildings. As a child, animals, humans and landscapes always caught my attention- they seemed to offer so much more in terms of colour, texture and movement to work with. As my love and skill for drawing more organic subjects grew, the frustrations with drawing buildings just multiplied. Perspectives of streets confused me, windows and bricks just always came out looking so … boring. Much like you can often tell an artists’ mood by looking at their artwork, you could tell a lot of my relationship with drawing buildings from my project work – a hope, a desperation to make it look perfect, then a flat, dull finished piece where I’d once again given up.

A couple of years ago, on a resolution-making day, I thought a lot about drawing buildings. I thought about my university course, and my wonderful tutors who had always seemed to know how to help me out of my comfort zone into something I was really passionate about. It’s been at the back of my mind ever since- when I went to Dublin and Edinburgh I took hundreds of pictures to help me study oddly shaped and colourful buildings, and dedicated a section of my external hard drive to artists who had drawn or painted them.

In Rain - Ludwig Bemelmans
Ludwig Bemelmans – from “Madeline” – “In Rain…”

I discovered two key things during this ongoing study.

a) My buildings didn’t have to be architecturally perfect. Not every window, door and brick had to be identical- in fact, the more I embraced the different shapes as opposed to getting bogged down in the detail, the more improvement I noticed.

b) The interest in buildings for me doesn’t necessarily lie in how they look… Their relationship to outside effects- eg. age, weather, daily routines happening around them is where their appeal lies.

In November of last year, my brother and I organised a surprise trip to Cornwall for my Mum’s birthday. Despite my previous studies, I realised during this visit that I’d never completed a project solely based around buildings. So, over the next couple of months, I documented our journeys around Marazion, Penzance and St. Ives through the buildings we came across, as often as I could completing a piece per day as a warm-up. One of my official New Year’s resolutions was to complete this project, and this post is designed to share it with you!

Kernow- A Visual Diary – © 2017/2018 Carina Roberts Illustration

The King's Arms (signed) 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“The King’s Arms” – Marazion

 

St. Ives Street (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“St. Ives Street” – St. Ives

St. Ives Street 2 - Elderly couple © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St Ives Street 2 – The Climb” – St. Ives

St. Ives Fishmonger (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Fishmonger” – St. Ives

St. Ives Day (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Daily Route” – St. Ives

Marazion High Street (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“High Street” – Marazion

St. Ives Street III Final (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St. Ives Street 3”

Marazion High Street - Night Final (low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Night” – Marazion

St. Ives Street 4 Final (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“St. Ives Street 4” – St. Ives

Cornish Pub sketch final (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“The Sloop Inn” – St. Ives

Penzance Harbour (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Penzance Harbour” – Penzance

Penzance Pub (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Penzance Pub” – Penzance

Market Place- St. Ives (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Market Place” – St. Ives

Marazion street painting (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Marazion Street” – Marazion

Jowder's Cottage (Low Res) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Jowders Morning” – Marazion

Washing Day Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Washing Day” – St. Ives

Beach Garden Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Beach Garden” – St. Ives

Marazion Dusk Final Artwork (72DPI) © 2018 Carina Roberts Illustration
“Dusk” – Marazion

 

I’m slowly improving in my building painting- in that I’ve learned a huge amount about why I always hated them as subject matter, and how I can apply the skills I’ve enjoyed in illustrating other things to making them interesting to me!

As you can see from some of these pages, I’m also actively doing a lot more work with different types of lighting (which has also scared me in the past) – another of my resolutions this year! There’s a post I would like to write soon about a very showery walk I went on recently up quite a steep hill- the patches of cloud and sunlight dancing across the blustery sky made for some really impressive lighting, which is my next challenge to have a go at painting since finishing this mini-project!

There’s a lot to look forward to this year, and a lot of work to be done… But that’s how I like it!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

 

 

“Cara”- Capturing animal behaviours in human form

Cara sleeping © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Hello my lovelies!

It’s been a while again, hasn’t it? This particular post has been a long time coming, but as it concerns a very special project I couldn’t rush it!

As I mentioned back in August, this time I’ll be discussing the development of a human character with all the grace of a seal, in a story I’m devloping which draws upon one of my favourite Irish legends. This project will eventually be put forward as an entry for a competition, so I’m not going to share much of the finished work until it’s all submitted. I can, however, share with you my process thus far of how this character has developed!

A little to begin with for those who haven’t yet understood the Irish legend I’m referring to.

The Selkie was a mythical creature who lived as a seal in the water, who by shedding its blubbery skin on land, would become human. Most of the stories I had read about Selkies had been sad, mostly where female Selkies had come ashore to have their skins hidden by possessive men who wanted to marry them for their beauty. If the skins were not found, the Selkie would remain trapped on land and could never return to the ocean.

Poor seals!

One thing I always found a little strange about the classic depiction of all the lady Selkies was their grace and poise on land. Of course, they may have been journeying out of the water every week to practice walking on land for all I know, but it got me thinking; how might a Selkie be who had never been out of the water before? Would they know how to walk down a flight of stairs, or sleep in a bed?

I wanted to create a human character with all of the heart, soul and playfulness of a seal. Clumsy, comical on land, unbelievably graceful in water. Cheeky, intelligent, sometimes greedy; inquisitive, sometimes shy and others very aggressive!

To begin this journey, I had to plunge headfirst into the realm of the seal.

The Seal Study

Seal behaviour sketches (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration .jpg
Seals drawn from BBC’s “Wild Ireland”.

Despite being one of my most favourite animals, I had never seen a seal in real life before setting out on this project. I’d seen sea lions at the zoo when I was younger, but they just weren’t the same (and also not native to UK or Irish waters.) In this case, the study of a seal’s behaviour was my first step in creating this very special character.

I did some research, discovering that one of the best times to see seals on land was during their breeding season, beginning round about September. One of the best places in the UK to track them down was apparently in West Pembrokeshire, on and around Skomer island. So, my partner and I made the trek across, to discover that the boat (due to bad weather) was not running that day. The crossing for Skomer is very near a National Trust walk around the Marloes Peninsula which we decided to do instead, to see if we could spot any of the elusive grey seals we were after from the cliff edges.

We were not disappointed.

Marloes Seals 2 (Detail 2) (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Mother seal, making her way into the cold Pembrokeshire ocean. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Marloes Seals (Detail) (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Waiting for the wave to pass… © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Marloes Seals 1 (72DPI) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Seal sketches- Pembrokeshire (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
Young seal pup still sporting its “lanugo”, (fluffy white baby coat) dragging itself across the sand to visit an older relative.

After this experience, I was looking everywhere for more seal inspiration to draw from. The first sketchbook I started for this project is absolutely bursting with hundreds of seals- from life, books, television, anywhere they could be found.

Seals eating plan
Did you know, a seal commonly has 3-6 pairs of eyebrows? © Artwork 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

I began to look for detail in each seal that I could use to start drafting a closely linked human character. The huge, liquid eyes, dark facial markings, and fluffed out, podgy, strong bodies of the animals I was studying were all things that seemed important to help draw the comparison between the two.

Cara seal expression sheet final (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Cara” – Exploring her human form. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Cara detail portrait (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Cara Portrait” – Dark whiskers on the seal pup’s face become a maze of freckles and thick eyebrows.  © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

After plenty of initial scribbling to begin to understand how Cara, as I named her, would translate into her more human guise, my next step was to explore how her movement might register as comically un-human. The natural starting point was to teach her how to walk.

Cara learns to walk (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“Cara learns to walk” – Sketch page. Trying to keep the low gravity and toddling, unsteady gait of a much younger child was my aim in “teaching” Cara to walk as a person. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

Every action Cara undertakes as a person initially has to look deliberate, determined and a little clumsy, to match the seal inside. Despite being a book concept, I have begun to plan certain spreads in my first dummy version of this story as you might a hand-drawn animation- exploring movement by movement how best to present a particular scene and different ways she might tackle them. As a method of working this hadn’t been planned from the start- but for a character with such unusual movements it’s far becoming my favourite!

Cara meal sketch detail (Low Res) © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
“The Meal” – detail from a sketchbook page. “Her freckled face peering inquisitvely over the bowl’s rim.” © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

One sequence I’m planning at the moment involves Cara’s first meal as a human. This would be the first instance where she would encounter crockery, cutlery, sitting down to eat (as well as table manners!) I’ve heard it said by many veteran illustrators that the best images depict the split second before something happens. Drawing close to frame by frame has helped me to determine the moment between intrigue and face-first feasting within this scene!

This is going to be a long journey, but one I feel really excited about. I’m still planning the first dummy draft of the full book, but each page of this is surrounded with notes- notes of research and reference material that will help make this world more real, as well as different, possibly more effective alternative spreads that I can trial alongside the one in this first draft. Like a comedy routine, it takes a lot of work and rehearsal to find the perfect joke- and to find the most effective ways to present the lovable, clumsy, and kind-hearted soul that is Cara.

——————————————–

Next time I’ll be sharing a visual diary from a recent trip to Cornwall- a mini-project I undertook to tackle some of my illustrative worries head on!

Thanks for reading!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Movement in Murmurations- Exploring patterns in the natural world through classical music

Good afternoon, lovely ones! Hope your weeks are all going well!

Last time, I told you the tale of a little house martin chick and my once-in-a-lifetime drawing experience with her. (If you didn’t get to read it yet, just have a quick scroll, you’ll find it beneath this post – “A Precious Thing”.) A quick update- she had her first flying lessons indoors, and has since been fully re-released back into the wild! She’s probably off on her own adventures by now, using those new fully-grown wings!

Around a month ago I found out about the SWLA exhibition held through the Mall Galleries in London – Wildlife Artist of the Year. I’m afraid I was a little over-optimistic in planning something to enter for the competition this year, but I’m slowly going to be developing my research over the coming months, ready for next year’s competition.

Completely by chance, and neatly linking into the house martin’s story since last time, I wanted to follow a bird theme for this competition. I so often draw mammals that birds weren’t really getting the recognition they deserved, and as well as wanting to try something a bit different, they were on my mind anyway due to my work earlier this year on the RPSB’s Big Garden Birdwatch at nursery.  Although the final artwork for the SWLA competition is far from fruition, I thought I would share some of my process up until now- as I really believe it could be something special!

The co-ordinator of a drawing event I attended a couple of years ago referred to the way I drew as “lyrical” – that I described not only my reference material but also the music I listened to at the time. I had been listening quite a lot to Rossini’s “The Thieving Magpie” Overture over a week’s period while working on a separate project, and one evening after reading the brief for the SWLA competition, the song and an earlier memory of some starlings grouped and swirling over a park in Wales (a murmuration) paired up in my mind.  I got thinking about how patterns in some classical music fit so perfectly within nature- and decided to do a little research.

As many things in nature are, I discovered that the pattern of a murmuration occurs through mathematics (more specifically in this case- mathematical chaos; where very small changes have a huge impact within the larger system) as every slight movement by each bird within a murmuration is amplified by all the other birds flying directly around it, creating the waves and rippling effects. The few times in my life I had seen a murmuration, I couldn’t help but conjure up a mental picture of a musical score, with all the birds within the pattern as individual notes within an orchestra, acting individually but also within the larger pattern of the whole. How could I replicate this in a drawing? As an experiment and something outside of my comfort zone a little, I decided to listen to some classical music and try drawing lines to describe what I was hearing. The drawings below are based on the aforementioned Rossini overture- “The Thieving Magpie”, or “La Gazza Ladra”. (You could try listening to it as you look at the following experiments- see if you can spot where the patterns came from!)

Murmuration ink sketches (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg

Step One – Feeling the music out!

The lines and marks that came out of this initial exercise follow the pitch and movement of the music.

After that, I followed the lines I’d drawn with tiny dots, or tiny birds, to bring the “murmuration” to life. The process was a little daunting at first, especially as the pen and ink I was using has a tendency to “blob” a bit! (Although after the first ten minutes, I actually quite liked the imperfection of the ink blobs!)

Murmuration ink sketches 1 (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration .jpg
Adding in the starlings, the beginnings of weaving each line together

As I attempted to follow the music in shape, I also tried to match the volume to the weight of the line I drew. As I begun to add the starlings in, I followed the same pattern- with more birds in the thicker areas, and just a scattering in the wispy lines. (I would like to try removing the lines to see what shapes I’m left with here, but that’s something for later!)

Murmuration ink sketches (Low Res) signed © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
And now, for the crescendo…!

As the speed and volume of the song built towards its end, so did the patterns… the spiral that begins at the left hand side of this page came from the final minute of the overture. Filling this space with birds was probably the best part of the whole exercise, and although it doesn’t ring completely true to how starlings might fly in real life, I’m sure there’s elements of this wild drawing that I can expand upon for the final artwork! After all, every bird in this spiral is attempting to fly as close as it possibly can to its neighbour: the ripple created at the bottom of the murmuration becomes less tense, and more and more amplified as it moves outwards- the same theory to how a real murmuration works!

I look forward to the next few months developing this idea and sharing updates on my progress along the way- it’s something a bit different to what I usually do, but that’s the most exciting part!

Next time, I’ll be writing a little about my progress on my silent book concept for a different competition (yes, finally! It’s been a while, but as promised, I’m getting round to it!) and how I’ve been developing a human character who has all the grace and appetite of a young seal!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

A precious thing!

Dear readers,

Happy July! I hope that wherever you are, you get the chance to have at least one icecream in the sunshine in the coming weeks! (If you’ve already had one… Get another for yourself and a friend so they can enjoy a treat and your overwhelming generosity!)

I’ve got so much to tell you about, I have been writing furiously about projects I’ve been working on over the past couple of months (including an update on the silent book concept I first mentioned at the end of last year!)

At the moment they’re all sat waiting for final edits in my “drafts” folder, but my aim is to release one every two- three weeks now (as I haven’t been very good with keeping up with my blog posts yet this year!)  – I’ve got a few crackers to share!

Something incredible happened this weekend, though, that before I could release any of my previous writing I HAD to share with you; before I burst with excitement, love and gratitude. A once in a lifetime experience, both fascinating and humbling.

For about a month I’ve been pretty down in the dumps after recovering from a particularly nasty flu bug. You know the type: the kind that karate-chops you to your knees and sends you packing to bed, and when you try to get up and make an effort to do something productive (to break the seemingly endless tedium of feeling teary and sore and sorry for yourself) it all goes a bit pear-shaped, your concentration is at 0% and the whole horrid cycle starts again. The sort that you’re sure is just hanging in there until you do one too many things in your week again, and re-releases all your favourite smash hits (like your amazing manly chesty cough that lends your impression of Tom Jones an extra something) and you just know it’s about to claw it’s way back to full strength again.

I went to visit my partner and his parents in order to hopefully throw this bug off once and for all; with fresh air, exercise and to see some animals.

And see some animals I did.

My partner’s father had taken in a house martin chick which was the only survivor from a flooded nest. He hadn’t suspected it to be alive much longer, but after over a week of feeding it with tweezers it had transformed into a plump little creature, with open, clear eyes and adult feathers just beginning to develop. I witnessed her many mealtimes and even had a go at feeding her, which was beautiful in itself- the food preparation “station” was next to her makeshift nest, and as we cut up the food into manageable pieces for her to swallow, she would cheep incredibly loudly and flap her tiny wings in excitement.

I asked one evening if I might be able to draw her. We brought her makeshift nest to the table, and the lamp my partner’s father used to keep her warm at night was used for a bit of extra light. As soon as I opened my sketchbook, she began to cheep, watching my every move with her tiny, beady eyes. She was around a foot away from me, and I could see every little detail on her tiny body; the youngster fluff clinging to the top of her head like large eyebrows, her perfect little wings and tail, with juvenile feathers coming through. I have never seen eyes so small or intense, each one no bigger than an individual blackberry pip, watching me with unbroken concentration, trying to work out if my pencils were food or not.

With music coming from the next room, I recognised an Irish folk song cover, the tune to which I learnt from the “Song of the Sea” film by Cartoon Saloon. I can’t speak Irish, but I know the title is “Dúlamán”, and even if I can’t understand the lyrics at present I know what the words should sound like, so I always have a good crack at singing along. As I drew I instinctively started humming and mumbling along, quietly so as not to frighten the little creature sat inches away from me.

And, in the way that she only ever did before when she was full and sleepy, the chick stopped cheeping. She looked me square in the eye as I sang, almost as though she was listening. I carried on drawing, but I barely looked down at my paper. Those tiny eyes held my gaze so ferociously I didn’t dare. In those precious moments I could almost see her first flights, her migrations, perhaps further than I might ever get in all my years in her first three or four. She sat silently until the song had finished, then almost as though she had been paused, she began cheeping and watching my paper again.

I have never stared for quite so long into the eyes of a wild creature before, but there was something in that sitting that is what every art tutor or teacher in the land tries to convey when they say they prefer you to draw from first-hand experiences, from life. There was energy rumbling through that little chick’s whole being that I never would have understood just from a photograph. Someone told me once that my work can be quite “lyrical”- if I listen to music as I draw, some of it in translated into the lines I use. Singing to that little creature allowed me to record just a tiny ounce of that experience into my favourite sketchbook.

All at once, that one intense, three minute eye-lock has cured me better than any flu medicine ever could.

Housemartin final 72DPI © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration
A beautiful creature. © 2017 Carina Roberts Illustration

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

Inktober 2016- Personalities of British Wildlife!

Good evening, lovely readers!

I’m delighted to announce that, for the first year since attempting the challenge, I have successfully completed Inktober!

For those of you who have never heard of it, Inktober is a simple concept- one sketch or artwork must be completed for every day of October, in an ink based medium… Whether it be an inky painting or even just a biro sketch, the whole idea is to keep up artistic momentum throughout the month, and to perhaps take the opportunity to dabble in a new medium. Inktober is called a challenge for a reason, though- it’s tricky to do a drawing every day on top of everything else that’s going on in life, particularly one that you’re proud of and happy to share with the world! I’ve struggled in the past but this year I was adamant that I would finish the challenge, with 31 drawings I was really happy with.

After going to an exhibition of Quentin Blake’s work earlier this year in Cardiff Museum, it’s been at the back of my mind to try working with bottled ink and a scratchy pen again. When I was younger I was very interested in calligraphy, receiving a small kit as a birthday present with a fine-nibbed fancy pen, different coloured bottled inks and smooth parchment paper. As I was searching for materials to use in this challenge, I came across them again at the back of my shelf, and decided it was high time for them to shine once more!

I think that part of the reason that I’ve struggled in the past is because I was always trying to think of a separate theme every day- after a couple of weeks, to keep spewing out an entire concept from scratch every day, AND complete all the other work I wanted and needed to get done, AND keep up with everything else always got a little too much for me to handle, so I would abandon the challenge.

This year, I decided on a different approach to make it work- to decide on, and stick to one theme that could run throughout, to transform it into a project I was really immersed in. Those who have followed my work over time will recognise my passion for nature and natural history, (many of my more recent characters and projects centring around animals) and I was very keen for this challenge to follow suit. In the end, I decided to spend this October exploring the characters of our best-loved British wildlife; my favourites can be found below! (The full 31 drawing-long shebang can be found here, in the album of “Inktober 2016”.)

Inktober Day 1 - Fat Robin signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day One- I tried to make sure that this exercise was never just about drawing a robin, instead I would try to truly see a robin for all it is- for its symbolism and significance, its character and personality in the grand scheme of our wonderful wildlife.

Inktober Day 2- Hedgehog signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Two- The hedgehog’s spikes were by far my favourite thing about this sketch- the scratchy pen I had on hand lent itself well to lots of quick little marks.

Inktober Day 5- Three British Owls signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Five- A trio of the wisest birds in the land. Their eyes always give the impression that they’ve seen everything.

Inktober Day 7- A Quartet of Edible mushrooms signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Seven- A little part of me danced for joy sketching this one… I’ve always had a huge interest in plants and fungi, maybe because when I was smaller I wanted to become a witch who made fancy brews from weird and wonderful ingredients. Either that, or a knight. Or a pirate.  I would have been happy with any of the above. Here are a collection of four edible mushrooms.

Day 14- Common Frog signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Fourteen- I’ve always struggled a little more with smooth-skinned creatures, as the lines you need to create a smooth as opposed to a furry body have to be a lot more clear and decisive. That said, I really enjoyed drawing these Common Frogs, and loved drawing in more fluid lines.

Day 17- Grey Seal Pup signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Ilustration.jpg
Day Seventeen- Grey Seal Pups. Cheeky, playful, stuffed full of charm and character- look at those liquid eyes! I remembered a particular video I once saw while drawing these little chaps which featured a seal in Ireland waiting patiently outside a fish and chip shop for an offering while completely blocking the road up.

Day 20- Badger signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Twenty- I’ve always loved the shambling way that badgers walk, not to mention their beautiful facial markings. I remember reading a story as a young child about how the badger got his stripes… He was marked as a thief with two blacks stripes after stealing a swan’s white feathers to fix his stained coat. On the contrary, badgers are usually depicted as more shy, kind creatures in most of our folk tales and popular fiction, a character which I preferred to coax out of this drawing.

Day 22- Shrewd signed © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Day Twenty-two. Shrewd. Shrewsbury. Shrewish. How-do-you-shrew. Pleasingly round, comical creatures, deceptively vicious. Solely carnivores too, apparently.

After this challenge had just ended, I had another opportunity to study the character of some Great British wildlife in the flesh, when I had the exciting privilege to meet a young wood mouse. My partner’s father is a talented photographer who also delights in natural subjects, and he had come across this young mouse one rainy, cold evening thinking it was dead… When he noticed it breathing, however, he brought it inside to the vivarium he often photographs caterpillars in to keep it warm and safe while it recovered (and take some pictures, of course!) He was convinced it was fairly young as it was very tame, and more inquisitive than anxious about human presence. A once in a lifetime opportunity for drawing- I was sat only inches away from the little creature as it gazed at me through huge, blackberry pip eyes. After a couple of trips back to its little nest of dry leaves to squiggle around, the mouse sat so still I was able to do a full colour sketch on the spot… In fact, it was so relaxed that it started to fall asleep!

Frankie Mouse © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
First introduction- little mouse comes to say hello! It was fascinating to watch its quick, decisive movements, and see how fast it breathes- it’s easy to forget that a mouse’s life is lived at twice, even three or four times the speed of ours… We must seem so lumbering and slow to them!

Frankie Mouse Sketchbook Page 2 © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
At one point, little mouse returned to its nest of dry leaves to peep out at me, leaving one large ear poking out of the gaps.

Frankie Mouse sketch sheet 3 © 2016 Carina Roberts Illustration.jpg
Little mouse stayed still for so long in the end that I managed to draw a full colour sketch in addition to lots of movement studies. A fine life model indeed!

You never know where you’ll find your next little source of inspiration, never shut your eyes or ears to the possibilities!

The AutumnHobbit

© Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Carina Roberts and AutumnHobbit with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Winter Fairs, First Frosts and The Grey People

Hello, and a Merry December to you all!

I’d like to start this post with a little story and observation that is particularly relevant at this time of year, I feel. When I was on the train a couple of weeks ago, returning from a trip to Hull during the wild weather, I was gratefully munching down my ham sandwich and peering out of the window at the ever-darkening landscapes flashing past. At every station, a handful of people would get on, wedging themselves into seats and cuddling in tight into their layers of clothing to try and thaw from the chill wind. Evidently, they were cold, and tired, and just wanted to get home- I understand. But a couple of them seemed to be saturated in this grey cloud, staring through my smiles and nods of acknowledgement and away again.

I’ve experienced this before, a few times, with a few characters really standing out in my memory as totally “grey” – one man I encountered on the bus a few months ago being the example that my memory will always jump to. He was the sort of character you just wanted to go and hug, and tell him that everything was going to be okay- life seemed to have sucked all the colour and joy from his bones, leaving his eyes dull and his mouth downturned. At this time of year, I always think of one of my very favourite stories of all time, “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens, and its main character, Ebenezer Scrooge. I always couldn’t help but feel sorry for the greedy old miser described in the tale. I remember a feeling of curiosity rather than despair or hatred the first time I heard the story: he was cold and unfeeling, yes, but why? I would wager that through the given descriptions of his youth, loneliness would be one of the largest reasons for Scrooge intially finding solace in his money and business, which would later cut him off from his peers, and also his heart.

Now, by no means will I, or can I, ever pass judgement on strangers I meet in the street- every soul has a thousand unspoken problems and worries that may glaze their eyes and leave them lost and unsure, and a little grey around the edges. We will all experience a period of this greyness, where life seems dull, repetitive and not heading in the direction we’d hoped. Money will be a worry for all of us at some point too, unless you’re incredibly lucky. But, I have realised, my greatest fear is that this will creep slowly, irreversibly into a heart and strip a person of all their character, all their passion and loves in life, until they lose all their colour permanently. People remember Scrooge for his tightfistedness, but I remember him for his indifference- his withered soul devoid of love for anything or anyone.

This Christmas, please help me in my main life’s aim- to prevent the onset of “total greyness” in everybody you encounter, including strangers. Please smile, be kind and generous in spirit- and you can help keep hearts warm, and the world more loved.

On that note, I’m overjoyed to announce that I’m currently still adding to a catalogue of greetings cards for “Thortful”, a new web-based “marketplace” which will officially launch in the New Year, which centres around a philosophy of making people happy- both creators and customers!

My cards will finally be available online!! They’re all animal-based, as with a great proportion of my work this year! The site is now live before its official launch, if you’d like a sneaky peek please follow this link to view my current collection!

In my last post, I mentioned a Christmas Fair I was participating in on the 5th of December. I’m pleased to say that it was a success- a step up from last year, and I received lots of lovely comments and compliments as well as making a fair few sales! Here’s some of the highlights in pictures:

5-12-15 Greetings cards photoPrince of Snow at craft fair5:12:15 Christmas Fair Stall Photo

As you can see from some of these images, bears have kept cropping up throughout my practice for a good while now. Any of you that look at my Facebook site as well as this blog will have seen a specific album dedicated to this study, which contains a few snippets of a personal project I’m working on (and one I am determined will be published!) My next post in January will contain a few little teasers of artwork that have been developing my ideas, as well as a short writeup of my influences so far.

I think all that remains is for me to wish you all a very Merry Christmas (and a God Jul to all of my Norwegian friends celebrating today!) – spend these special days with all your dearest ones, laughing and making merry. Presence will always trump presents, after all.

The AutumnHobbit

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